The Bible Retold: The Lost Sheep by Ben Pennington.

Hedgerows? I don't imagine the Holy Land with hedgerows. But then, if shepherds can abide in the fields by night I suppose they must have something round the edges of the fields. I'll pass it.

All around you, your sheep are readying themseles for sleep. They nestle in the thick grass of the large field, clearly exhausted after a hard day of grazing. But there is dissent amongst the ranks! One of your sheep makes a run for the next field, jumping gracefully over the hedgerows. You stand up quickly and collect your crook. You need that sheep!

The Bible Retold: The Lost Sheep
A light-hearted adaptation of the Parable of the Lost Sheep, by Ben Pennington.

Please type 'about' for general game information.

Release 1 / Serial number 130000 / Inform v6.31 Library 6/11 S

Large, grassy field
The lush green grass of this large field makes it perfect for keeping sheep. They graze all day, but the grass never seems to thin. Through the thick hedgrerows to the west lies another of your fields and a track winds north towards Bethlehem.

A ninety-nine strong herd huddles in front of you, counting each other when they want to sleep. Where could that other sheep have gone?

> x sheep
(your herd of sheep)
Ninety-nine of your sheep huddle together in the grass for warmth. Where the other is, you dread to think; you must find it.

> i
You are carrying:
your crook
your cloak (being worn)

> x me
You are a Judean shepherd, wearing a shabby white cloak. You live for your beloved sheep; how could you have let one of them go missing?!

> x hedgerows
Thick hedgerows surround you on most sides, except to the north and west. They seem pretty impenetrable, and you can't jump as well as the sheep can.

> w

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

The bushes rustle suspiciously.

> x bushes
Thick mulberry bushes surround the tree; the berries won't be appearing until later in the year, though.

The bushes rustle occasionally.

> search bushes
As you walk forward, the bush rustles loudly. You pull away the leaves, and there it is: your lost sheep!

The sheep, shocked at its discovery, leaps high into the air and vaults the hedge to the southeast.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> x tree
A very old tree - you remember it from your childhood, when you used to play around its trunk - rests here. The lack of leaves on its branches indicates that the tree is now dead.

> climb it
You scale the gnarly tree easily...

Atop the tree
The tree, while old and creaking, stands tall and proud amongst your fields. You haven't climbed it in years, but your feet follow the dry branches perfectly.

You think you spot the sheep in the southeast field, but when you look again, it is gone.

> d
You climb down the tree.

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> se

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a peculiar rustle from the rosemary bush.

> search rosemary
The bush makes a great rustle and your lost sheep bursts from inside! Frightened, it runs into the hawthorn bush.

> get sheep with crook
You can't see any such thing.

> use crook
Be more specific.

> i
You are carrying:
your crook
your cloak (being worn)

> catch sheep with crook
That's not a verb I recognise.

> grab sheep
That's not a verb I recognise.

Yes it is though.

> get sheep
The lost sheep is nowhere nearby.

> enter hawthorn
You're not small enough!

> search hawthorn
As you step forward, the bush makes an almighty rustle and the lost sheep bursts from underneath! Scared, it jumps off into the rosemary bush.

> search rosemary
As you step forward, the bush makes an almighty rustle and the lost sheep bursts from underneath! Scared, it jumps off into the juniper bush.

> w

Field of daisies
You very rarely come to this field, and on walking in, you see why; it's nothing but daisies. Small, white daisies. How very peculiar.

> w
The hedgerow in this direction surrounds the field, parting to the northeast, southeast and east.

> ne

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> sw

Field of daisies
Daisies cover the ground of this field, replacing the grass completely. In fact, you see nothing but daisies, except to the northeast, southeast and east, where the hedgerows part. How odd.

> se

The northern riverbank
A babbling stream makes up the southern border of the scraggy field. There is a tree on the opposite bank looming over the water, and the tree itself is being loomed over by a mountain range, which starts not too far beyond the water. There are gaps in the hedgerows to the northwest and northeast.

A herd of buffalo lumbers towards you from the east.

> x buffalo
They lumber towards you from the east. There are loads of them: you can't even see the tail end of the herd.

The buffalo herd continues walking towards you.

> ne

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear an odd rustle from the juniper bush.

> put crook in juniper
You step forward towards the bush. Before you reach it, the lost sheep jumps from inside! Terrified, it pounces off into the rosemary bush.

> put crook in juniper
Your crook is far too precious to leave lying around in bushes.

> hook sheep
That's not a verb I recognise.

> crook sheep
That's not a verb I recognise.

> nw

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> e

Large, grassy field
The lush green grass of this large field makes it perfect for keeping sheep. They graze all day, but the grass never seems to thin. Through the thick hedgrerows to the west lies another of your fields and a track winds north towards Bethlehem.

Your herd lies in the middle of the field, counting each other when they want to sleep. Now where is that other sheep?

> n
You couldn't possibly leave without the lost sheep.

> w

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> se

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a conspicuous rustle from the rosemary bush.

> sw

The northern riverbank
A babbling stream makes up the southern border of the scraggy field. There is a tree on the opposite bank looming over the water, and the tree itself is being loomed over by a mountain range, which starts not too far beyond the water. There are gaps in the hedgerows to the northwest and northeast.

As the buffalo get close to you, they turn right and start to wade across the river.

> s
The river, rushing in front of you, blocks your passage by foot.

The first buffalo reaches the other side and continues to the east, followed by the second and third. Before long, you can no longer see the water where the buffalo are, only hooves.

> x buffalo
Large and strong creatures, these buffalo are crossing the stream, splashing noisily through the water. As they reach the other side, they continue eastwards.

> save
Ok.

> x tree
(the weeping willow)
An old tree, the weeping willow hangs mournfully over the riverbank. The long shadow it casts stops at your feet.
>
climb tree
(the weeping willow)
You're too far away for that!

> swim
As you jump into the river, the fast-flowing water drags you eastwards. You knock your head on the way, going unconscious...

As you wake up, you find yourself lying in the middle of a...

Field of daisies
Daisies cover the ground of this field, replacing the grass completely. In fact, you see nothing but daisies, except to the northeast, southeast and east, where the hedgerows part. How peculiar.

There are strange markings surrounding you. It's a crop circle!

> x circle
The crop circle glows mysteriously for a few seconds, then disappears.

> l

Field of daisies
Daisies cover the ground of this field, replacing the grass completely. In fact, you see nothing but daisies, except to the northeast, southeast and east, where the hedgerows part. How peculiar.

> e

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a loud rustle from the rosemary bush.

The gnarly stick seems to have dried out.

> x stick
Despite the wear and tear, this sturdy wooden stick has served you well. You would never be without it.

> i
You are carrying:
your crook
your cloak (being worn)

> x crook
Despite the wear and tear, this sturdy wooden stick has served you well. You would never be without it.

> x cloak
An everyday white cloak that has become quite shabby, what with you looking after a large herd of sheep.

> remove cloak
Society tends to frown upon such displays of nudity. You look perfectly handsome with it on, anyway.

> burn bush
Which do you mean, the hawthorn bush, the rosemary bush or the juniper bush?

> hawthorn
So let me get this straight. You want to rub your fingers together and make a fire that will set the bush ablaze? Mad. Utterly mad.

> nw

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> x grass
The thick grass comes up to your knees.

> x bushes
Thick mulberry bushes surround the tree; the berries won't be appearing until later in the year, though.

> e

Large, grassy field
The lush green grass of this large field makes it perfect for keeping sheep. They graze all day, but the grass never seems to thin. Through the thick hedgrerows to the west lies another of your fields and a track winds north towards Bethlehem.

Huddling for warmth, ninety-nine sheep lie before you. Where could the hundredth sheep have got to?

> x sheep
(your herd of sheep)
Ninety-nine of your sheep huddle together in the grass for warmth. Where the other is, you dread to think; you must find it.

> whistle
That's not a verb I recognise.

> x grass
Lush green grass covers the ground. It doesn't seem to thin, despite the best efforts of your sheep.

> w

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> se

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a conspicuous rustle from the rosemary bush.

> sw

The northern riverbank
A babbling stream makes up the southern border of the scraggy field. There is a tree on the opposite bank looming over the water, and the tree itself is being loomed over by a mountain range, which starts not too far beyond the water. There are gaps in the hedgerows to the northwest and northeast. A large herd of buffalo crosses the stream noisily.

> x buffalo
Large and strong creatures, these buffalo are crossing the stream, splashing noisily through the water. As they reach the other side, they continue eastwards.

> ride buffalo
Those bushes are far too intriguing to continue over the river.

> x range
The mountain - which is more like a hill compared with the range behind it - looms over the stream. You can just about make out a path leading southwest upwards, but you can't be sure from this distance.

> se
The river, rushing in front of you, blocks your passage by foot.

> ne

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a peculiar rustle from the rosemary bush.

> hit rosemary bush
You step forward towards the bush. Before you reach it, the lost sheep jumps from inside! Terrified, it pounces off into the hawthorn bush.

> flatten juniper
That's not a verb I recognise.

> cut juniper
Cutting that up would achieve little, especially given you don't have a knife.

> l

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a strange rustle from the hawthorn bush.

> shout
What do you want to shout?

> scream
(to the lost sheep)
The lost sheep ignores you.

> sheep, hello
Sadly, the lost sheep is nowhere nearby.

> sing
Your singing leaves a lot to be desired.

> w

Field of daisies
Daisies cover the ground of this field, replacing the grass completely. In fact, you see nothing but daisies, except to the northeast, southeast and east, where the hedgerows part. How odd.

> ne

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> u
You climb up the tree.

Atop the tree
The tree, while old and creaking, stands tall and proud amongst your fields. You haven't climbed it in years, but your feet follow the dry branches perfectly.

> x branches
Proud and strong, these branches hold your weight well, just as they did when you were young. One gnarly branch hangs loosely above your head; it seems to be dry, but dead.

> get branch
Which do you mean, the gnarly stick or the branches?

> branches
You break off the loose stick from above your head.

> l

Atop the tree
The tree, while old and creaking, stands tall and proud amongst your fields. You haven't climbed it in years, but your feet follow the dry branches perfectly.

> x branches
Proud and strong, these branches hold your weight well, just as they did when you were young.

> i
You are carrying:
a gnarly stick
your crook
your cloak (being worn)

> d
You climb down the tree.

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> x bushes
Thick mulberry bushes surround the tree; the berries won't be appearing until later in the year, though.

> search bushes
You see nothing but leaves. The berries won't be out until later in the year.

> e

Large, grassy field
The lush green grass of this large field makes it perfect for keeping sheep. They graze all day, but the grass never seems to thin. Through the thick hedgrerows to the west lies another of your fields and a track winds north towards Bethlehem.

Huddling for warmth, ninety-nine sheep lie before you. Now where is that other sheep?

> w

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> se

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear an odd rustle from the hawthorn bush.

> put stick in juniper
Which do you mean, the gnarly stick or the crook?

> gnarly
The juniper bush doesn't seem to pay any attention.

> i
You are carrying:
a gnarly stick
your crook
your cloak (being worn)

> throw gnarly at sheep
(the gnarly stick at the lost sheep)
You're not interested in using weaponry.

> listen
You hear an odd rustle from the hawthorn bush.

> talk to bush
Which do you mean, the hawthorn bush, the rosemary bush or the juniper bush?

> hawthorn
Unfortunately, you can't think of anything to say.

> talk to sheep
Unfortunately, you can't think of anything to say.

> l

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a curious rustle from the hawthorn bush.

> get grass
I think you'd better leave that to your herd; they're quite the experts!

> sw

The northern riverbank
A babbling stream makes up the southern border of the scraggy field. There is a tree on the opposite bank looming over the water, and the tree itself is being loomed over by a mountain range, which starts not too far beyond the water. There are gaps in the hedgerows to the northwest and northeast. A large herd of buffalo crosses the stream noisily.

In the water's depths, you spot two fish, who promptly swim out of sight.

> ne

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a strange rustle from the hawthorn bush.

> i
You are carrying:
a gnarly stick
your crook
your cloak (being worn)

> l

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a conspicuous rustle from the hawthorn bush.

> l

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a conspicuous rustle from the hawthorn bush.

> rub stick with crook
(the gnarly stick with the crook)
You strike the gnarly stick on your crook and - as if by magic - you create fire! Fabulous!

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> burn juniper
You touch the woody bush with your burning stick and it instantly sets on fire.

> burn rosemary
You touch the woody bush with your burning stick and it instantly sets on fire.

The juniper bush stops burning and returns exactly to the state it was before. You think you hear a chuckle from above, but you can't be sure.

> save
Ok.

> search hawthorn
The sheep jumps out from the bush, takes one look at the burning rosemary and bounds off towards the stream.

The rosemary bush fizzles out and returns exactly to the state it was before. You think you hear a chuckle from above, but you can't be sure.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> score
You have so far scored 3 out of a possible 4, in 98 turns.

> sw

The northern riverbank
A babbling stream makes up the southern border of the scraggy field. There is a tree on the opposite bank looming over the water, and the tree itself is being loomed over by a mountain range, which starts not too far beyond the water. There are gaps in the hedgerows to the northwest and northeast. A large herd of buffalo crosses the stream noisily.

> ride buffalo
You jump onto the back of the nearest buffalo, who promptly takes you over to the other side of the stream and deposits you there. He lumbers off to the east, with the rest of the herd.

The southern riverbank
You spot the sheep running up the mountain in front of you! Get 'im!

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> get sheep
The lost sheep is nowhere nearby.

> s

Northern mountainside
You are on the northern face of a mountain. Alpine shrubs adorn the sides of the path, which continues up the mountain to the southeast. Back down - to the north - is the stream.

A herd of about twenty goats lounges here.

You spot the sheep running up the mountain in front of you! Get 'im!

> s
You would surely die!

> se

Eastern mountainside
The eastern face of this mountain gets the blaze of the morning sun; you can see just by standing here that sunrise would be spectacular. The same alpine shrubs cover the ground as lower down and the winding path twists round from northwest to southwest.

You spot the sheep running up the mountain in front of you! Get 'im!

> sw

Southern mountainside
This, the southern mountainside, gets most of the sun throughout the day; the alpine shrubs are particularly dense here. The path leads north to what you can only assume is the summit, and back down to the northeast.

You spot the sheep running up the mountain in front of you! Get 'im!

> n

Atop the mountain
A small log cabin is perched to the west, with smoke pouring from its rickety chimney, behind which the path runs south. You can clearly see why someone would want to live here. If the views lower down were good, then these are just phenomenal. Even with the bracing wind, you could happily spend an entire day up here. However, you are not here to enjoy the view; you have a sheep to retrieve.

The sheep walks purposefully into the small hut.

That was pretty short. Nothing much wrong with it, but nothing interesting either.

Shouldn't the other sheep be annoyed about the time I lavished on the lost one? Or am I confusing this parable with the one about the prodigal son?

> in
You press your hand against the door of the hut, ready to finally catch the lost sheep. As you enter, you see the sheep cowering in a corner. You lift it onto your broad shoulders, rejoicing. You make your way back to the large, grassy field, calling all of your friends and neighbours to celebrate with you. You have found the sheep which was lost.

*** You have won ***

In that game you scored 4 out of a possible 4, in 107 turns.

Would you like to RESTART, RESTORE a saved game, UNDO your last move, see some suggestions for AMUSING things to do or QUIT?
>
amusing

Just a few things to try in the course of the game...

Repeatedly going north from the Large, Grassy Field.
Burning your cloak.
Making a daisy chain.
Using the daisy chain to lasso the willow tree.
Burning the bridge.
Repeatedly planting the daisies on the mountain.
Dragging yourself through a hedge backwards.
FIND SHEEP.
Swimming in the stream. Pole vaulting over the stream.
Repeatedly listening to the stream.
Using the result to cross the stream.
Interacting with the sheep and goats (ASK, TELL, SHOW, GIVE, ORDER).
Repeatedly ordering the sheep to eat the grass.
Burning the alpine shrubs.

Would you like to RESTART, RESTORE a saved game, UNDO your last move, see some suggestions for AMUSING things to do or QUIT?
>
restart

All around you, your sheep are readying themseles for sleep. They nestle in the thick grass of the large field, clearly exhausted after a hard day of grazing. But there is dissent amongst the ranks! One of your sheep makes a run for the next field, jumping gracefully over the hedgerows. You stand up quickly and collect your crook. You need that sheep!

The Bible Retold: The Lost Sheep
A light-hearted adaptation of the Parable of the Lost Sheep, by Ben Pennington.

Please type 'about' for general game information.

Release 1 / Serial number 130000 / Inform v6.31 Library 6/11 S

Large, grassy field
The lush green grass of this large field makes it perfect for keeping sheep. They graze all day, but the grass never seems to thin. Through the thick hedgrerows to the west lies another of your fields and a track winds north towards Bethlehem.

A ninety-nine strong herd huddles before you, counting each other when they want to sleep. Where could the hundredth sheep have got to?

> n
You couldn't possibly leave without the lost sheep.

> n
The lost sheep needs you!

> n
Well, what the hell, you think to yourself. Throwing aside your crook for good measure you stride down the path, attracting perplexed looks from your herd. But you don't care. You wander onwards, around the curvy paths and over the hills, then across the deserted, earthy landscape towards the city.

When you reach Jerusalem you realise the truth: shepherding wasn't really for you. You've wasted nigh-on twenty years of your life. It's time to enjoy yourself for a change. You head eagerly into the nearest drinking establishment and establish a habit of drinking within thirty minutes.

Weeks later, you stagger (or did you swagger?) out of a tavern and into a dusty back-street. And there, curled up in an unkempt corner of the alley, almost concealed by shadow, is your old, lost sheep. His face is drawn and haggard. He huddles up against the cold wall with a dirty old sheet over his thinned body. He reeks of cider and gin; his wool is shrivelled; empty packets of cigarettes litter the ground around him.

"Desmond?" you say. "Is that you?" But then you realise. He does not even recognise you. You are but a faded memory of a distant past that he has drunk away into oblivion.

Oh no. What have you done? No! You sink to your knees and break into tears. Woe for the lost sheep! Oh, if things could have been different - if only they could have been different! If only you could have just one more chance - if only you could go back... and set things right!

And the moral of the story is: save your game regularly, and then you can.

*** You have ruined both your life and that of your sheep. ***

In that game you scored 0 out of a possible 4, in 3 turns.

Would you like to RESTART, RESTORE a saved game, UNDO your last move or QUIT?
>
restart

All around you, your sheep are readying themseles for sleep. They nestle in the thick grass of the large field, clearly exhausted after a hard day of grazing. But there is dissent amongst the ranks! One of your sheep makes a run for the next field, jumping gracefully over the hedgerows. You stand up quickly and collect your crook. You need that sheep!

The Bible Retold: The Lost Sheep
A light-hearted adaptation of the Parable of the Lost Sheep, by Ben Pennington.

Please type 'about' for general game information.

Release 1 / Serial number 130000 / Inform v6.31 Library 6/11 S

Large, grassy field
The lush green grass of this large field makes it perfect for keeping sheep. They graze all day, but the grass never seems to thin. Through the thick hedgrerows to the west lies another of your fields and a track winds north towards Bethlehem.

Your herd lies in front of you. Where could the hundredth sheep have got to?

> w

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

The bushes rustle suspiciously.

> sw

Field of daisies
You very rarely come to this field, and on walking in, you see why; it's nothing but daisies. Small, white daisies. How very odd.

> e

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

> w

Field of daisies
Daisies cover the ground of this field, replacing the grass completely. In fact, you see nothing but daisies, except to the northeast, southeast and east, where the hedgerows part. How peculiar.

> get daisies
You pull a clump of daisies from the ground.

> make chain
(from the clump of daisies)
Stringing the daisies together, you create a daisy chain. How cute.

> e

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

> sw
You are too curious about the rustling in the rugged field to investigate the stream. You need to find that sheep!

> w

Field of daisies
Daisies cover the ground of this field, replacing the grass completely. In fact, you see nothing but daisies, except to the northeast, southeast and east, where the hedgerows part. How peculiar.

> w
The hedgerow in this direction surrounds the field, parting to the northeast, southeast and east.

> ne

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

The bushes rustle suspiciously.

> search bushes
As you walk forward, the bush rustles loudly. You pull away the leaves, and there it is: your lost sheep!

The sheep, shocked at its discovery, leaps high into the air and vaults the hedge to the southeast.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> sw

Field of daisies
Daisies cover the ground of this field, replacing the grass completely. In fact, you see nothing but daisies, except to the northeast, southeast and east, where the hedgerows part. How peculiar.

> se

The northern riverbank
A babbling stream makes up the southern border of the scraggy field. There is a tree on the opposite bank looming over the water, and the tree itself is being loomed over by a mountain range, which starts not too far beyond the water. There are gaps in the hedgerows to the northwest and northeast.

A herd of buffalo lumbers towards you from the east.

> lassoo tree
(the weeping willow)
You grab the daisy chain and throw it towards the willow. It catches on one of the stray branches and is lodged securely.

The buffalo herd continues walking towards you.

> climb chain
I don't think much is to be achieved by that.

As the buffalo get close to you, they turn right and start to wade across the river.

> pull chain
You pull and pull, heave and heave, tug and tug on the chain, until eventually, the tree falls forwards onto the river. Great! You have a bridge!The buffalo stop crossing the stream for a moment as they hear the loud crashing of the tree. They look towards the bridge, but deciding it isn't a threat, they continue their walking.

The first buffalo reaches the other side and continues to the east, followed by the second and third. Before long, you can no longer see the water where the buffalo are, only hooves.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> s
Those bushes are far too intriguing to continue over the river.

> nw

Field of daisies
Daisies cover the ground of this field, replacing the grass completely. In fact, you see nothing but daisies, except to the northeast, southeast and east, where the hedgerows part. How peculiar.

> ne

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> u
You ascend the tree.

Atop the tree
The tree, while old and creaking, stands tall and proud amongst your fields. You haven't climbed it in years, but your feet follow the dry branches perfectly.

You think you spot the sheep in the southeast field, but when you look again, it is gone.

> x branches
Proud and strong, these branches hold your weight well, just as they did when you were young. One gnarly branch hangs loosely above your head; it seems to be dry, but dead.

> get stick
(the gnarly stick)
You break off the loose stick from above your head.

> d
You climb down the tree.

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> se

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a loud rustle from the hawthorn bush.

> rub stick with crook
(the gnarly stick with the crook)
You strike the gnarly stick on your crook and - as if by magic - you create fire! Fabulous!

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> sw

The northern riverbank
A babbling stream makes up the southern border of the scraggy field. There is a willow tree bridge looming over the water, and the tree itself is being loomed over by a mountain range, which starts not too far beyond the water. There are gaps in the hedgerows to the northwest and northeast. A large herd of buffalo crosses the stream noisily.

> burn bridge
As your mother always told you, it's best not to burn your bridges: you never know when you might need them. She may not have been speaking literally at the time, but that doesn't matter in the context of this anecdote.

> find sheep
Nice try. Have a point!

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> find sheep
Doing it again wouldn't have the same comedic effect.

Sorry, but we wouldn't want to mess up the score now, would we?

[Your score has just gone down by one point.]

> find sheep
Doing it again wouldn't have the same comedic effect.

> ne

Scraggy field
This field marks the edge of your land, and you don't frequent it often; the coarse grass underfoot exemplifies the tough nature of the terrain. Before you lie three bushes, beaten into strange shapes by the prevailing easterly wind: hawthorn on the left, rosemary in the centre and juniper on the far right.

The hedgerows trail off to the southwest, showing a river beyond. To the west is another of your fields and you can just make out the gnarly tree to the northwest.

You hear a peculiar rustle from the hawthorn bush.

> nw

Rugged field
You don't use this field as much as the one to the east. Without the attention from your herd, the grass has grown very long; it now extends to your knees. A gnarly old tree stands in the middle of the field, surrounded by mulberry bushes. The sweeping hedgerows break to the southwest and southeast, and you can just make out your herd grazing to the east.

> e

Large, grassy field
The lush green grass of this large field makes it perfect for keeping sheep. They graze all day, but the grass never seems to thin. Through the thick hedgrerows to the west lies another of your fields and a track winds north towards Bethlehem.

A ninety-nine strong herd huddles in front of you. Where could the hundredth sheep have got to?

> sheep, hello
Your herd look at you in a generally non-plussed manner.

> sheep, w
Better keep them here: you don't want more of your sheep running off.

> sheep, w
Better keep them here: you don't want more of your sheep running off.

> ask sheep about sheep
(your herd of sheep about your herd of sheep)
They look from side to side, obviously confused as to what you want to know. You raised them, and probably know more than they do.

> quit
Are you sure you want to quit? y