Aotearoa by Matt Wigdahl.

The options here are a little overwhelming. Numbers 1 to 4 would be better as two separate yes/no questions. And can't the game check itself whether the characters are printable and the colours are displayed? It should only ask the user if Glk can't supply the information.

Welcome to Aotearoa !

Display Test:

Āā Ēē Īī Ōō Ūū

This is an interactive fiction story that uses both colored text and special, non-English letters, specifically Polynesian vowels with macrons (horizontal lines) over them.

If no words above were colored or emphasized,
or if you didn't see the characters as vowels with macrons,
or if you want to adjust the colors displayed,
or if you want to see interpreter compatibility information,
press
K now.

Press R to restore an existing story, or a number from 1 to 4 to start a new story...

1 ) ...with an in-game tutorial for new players, as well as color keyword highlighting in the text.
2 ) ...with an in-game tutorial for new players, but no keyword highlighting.
3 ) ...with no tutorial, but with color keyword highlighting in the text.
4 ) ...with no tutorial and no keyword highlighting.

The waka floats in the deep ocean, the sun motionless and searing in the clear sky. Māui, the trickster, casts his fishing line into the depths of the ocean, tied to his magic hook made from a human jawbone. Almost immediately the hook catches, and he pulls up an enormous fish that somehow becomes, as you watch, an entire continent. On that new continent magnificent dinosaurs -- taniwha -- prowl the dark forests. Volcanoes dim the sky with smoke and stain the air with the stench of sulfur, but the land is rich and fertile, and Māui's older brothers look on it with greed in their eyes. Māui watches them, deep in thought, with a faraway expression you can't read. Then he turns to look directly into your eyes, and says, "You know that some of my brothers cannot be trusted. You must keep them from carving up this great fish until I return from the gods with the proper karakia ."

And suddenly he's gone, flying away into the sun in the form of a seabird, and you're left floating in the waka with Māui's brothers as they smile secret half-smiles to each other and reach for their knives, and you wonder what in the world Māui thinks that you, twelve-year-old Tim Cooper, can do to stop them before they carve up and defile...

Please press SPACE to continue.

Aotearoa
An Interactive Adventure by Matt Wigdahl
Release 1 / Serial number 100928 / Inform 7 build 6E72 (I6/v6.31 lib 6/12N)
Difficulty Level:
Introductory Cruelty Level: Polite

*** First-time players should type ABOUT ***

A hand gently shakes your shoulder, and the in-flight magazine falls off your chest as you startle awake. "Sorry, Tim. We've arrived," the stewardess says, and passes on. But the dreams don't leave with her, and the rest of the trip passes in a haze: the terminal; the tall Māori man with fierce tattoos on his face who greets you on arrival; the trip through unfamiliar streets to a Conservation Service cutter. In a way it's a good thing. If you had to think about what you're getting yourself into, you might be too afraid to go through with it. You stand on the prow of the small ship, fear and excitement swirling around inside you so you can hardly tell them apart. You're going to see real, live dinosaurs, and that's great, but you're alone and afraid, and nothing is familiar here, and that's... not great.

The man, Eruera, walks up to stand beside you, taking in the same view, shading his eyes with a powerful hand as he looks forward. The whipping ocean wind tries to carry his words away, and his accent is thick, but he has a friendly, open smile. "Don't worry about your flight getting delayed. We'll catch you up to the other group in no time." He studies your face, sees the concern. "Come now, you must be excited to start, yes? Everyone is! You are ready to work?"

Excitement gets the upper hand for now and you grin just a bit -- you can't help it. "I still can't believe I got picked to come! I get to see real dinosaurs? That's so cool!"

Eruera laughs, a startling, wild sound. "You may not think it is quite so 'cool' after picking through dinosaur roka for a few days, Tim."

You cock your head a bit, not quite sure you understood. " Roka "?

He just looks back at you silently, the friendly grin growing a bit wider.

Oh .

The Prow
The cutter 's hydrofoil brings the ship high out of the water -- high enough that there's very little spray. The wind whips past as the boat glides across the ocean off the coast to port. Thick, deep green bands of forest snake along the coastline to port. The treeline tracks stretches of black sand beach , sharp cliffs of dark volcanic rock, and the occasional salt marsh . The ocean glares as you look at the shore, almost overpoweringly blue.

A dark feather from some sort of seabird flutters in the wind, caught in a small gap in the guardrail.

You hear an incomprehensible yell from the general direction of the bridge. Eruera turns toward it, then closes his eyes for an instant. "I told them to double-check those gaskets," he sighs. "I'd better go help them before we're dead in the water."

He starts to leave, then turns back to you for a moment. "Why don't you head to the bridge? They've got sandwiches in there; I'm sure you're hungry after all your traveling. I'll catch up with you after I sort things out below decks."

Eruera sprints off to aft.

> about

> Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Aotearoa is an interactive fiction adventure story, designed to be fun for all ages!

"Interactive Fiction" is a kind of writing that puts you, the reader, into the story as the main character! You make the decisions as to what your character will do and where to go by typing in instructions to the computer at the ">" prompt. The story will then decide what happens next, tell you what happens, and then give you a chance to type in another instruction. Play continues in this way until you reach an end to the story. But remember that there might be several different endings, and some may be better, more successful, or more fun endings than others. You can always try different decisions in the story to try to reach different endings.

If you have never played an interactive fiction story before, please read the "Instructions for Play" section in the main help menu for much more detailed advice on how to play and what kinds of commands the computer can understand.

Aotearoa takes place in an alternate history where the ancient continent of Zealandia never sank below the waves in the late Cretaceous period, and retains its Māori name of Aotearoa. Many prehistoric and other extinct animals still live on the continent -- including dinosaurs! And you, as the character of 12-year-old Tim Cooper, will have a chance to visit and interact with them!

Please note -- although the game depicts a fictional continent of Zealandia, and dinosaurs are involved in the game, great effort was made to remain faithful to the history and geography of the real New Zealand where possible, and to present an accurate picture of the language and culture of the Māori people. We hope you have fun and learn something new (maybe several somethings new) at the same time!

Please press SPACE to continue.

> Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

> Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
> Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
> Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
> Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
> Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

For the most part, the standard IF verbs apply, but there are a few extra actions you can take that are fairly non-standard:

RIDE will allow you to attempt to ride a vehicle or animal.
Once you are on an animal, you can control it by trying to go FASTER or SLOWER, or turn LEFT or RIGHT.
NAME will allow you to give an animal a nickname that will then be used in the text and be recognized by the parser.
UNNAME will allow you to remove a nickname from an animal that already has one.

Additional meta-commands (commands that help you control the game without affecting the game world) are:

THINGS will print out a list of all the items in the area that you might be able to interact with. Note that this will also include scenery and other things that only support limited interaction.
EXITS prints out a list of the directions you can go from the area you're in.
EXIT COLOR rotates through the available colors for the status line exit lister.
EXITS OFF turns off the status line exit lister altogether.
EXITS ON turns the status line exit lister back on.
KEYWORDS brings up a menu that lets you change how object and topic keywords are presented.
TUTORIAL MODE OFF turns off the built-in tutorial.
TUTORIAL MODE ON turns on the built-in tutorial.
SKIP will make the tutorial system skip the current step and move on to the next one.

Please press SPACE to continue.

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
> Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
> Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
> Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
> Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

To Thomas, who inspired this in more ways than one, and Robin, who facilitated this in more ways than one.

Please press SPACE to continue.

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
> Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
> Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
> About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
> About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Matt Wigdahl is a husband, a father of three children, a software engineer, a racquetball player, a gamer, an amateur historian, a very amateur cook, and an avid reader. He's been a fan of interactive fiction since his high-school days, when he beta-tested several titles for Infocom. This is his second work of interactive fiction. His website is at http://www.wigdahl.net/quern.

Please press SPACE to continue.

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
> About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
> About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

The Prow
The cutter 's hydrofoil brings the ship high out of the water -- high enough that there's very little spray. The wind whips past as the boat glides across the ocean off the coast to port. Thick, deep green bands of forest snake along the coastline to port. The treeline tracks stretches of black sand beach , sharp cliffs of dark volcanic rock, and the occasional salt marsh . The ocean glares as you look at the shore, almost overpoweringly blue.

A dark feather from some sort of seabird flutters in the wind, caught in a small gap in the guardrail.

> x feather
It's a small, grayish feather, possibly from a white-bellied tāiko or other seabird.

> get it
Taken.

You think you see something large moving on shore -- could it be a dinosaur? You wish your binoculars weren't stowed in your luggage.

> x me
You're a bit taller than average for your age, with dark brown hair and green eyes. Currently you're feeling a bit hungry, a bit thirsty, and very nervously excited about getting to camp and seeing the dinosaurs.

> i
You are carrying:
a seabird
feather

> x dinosaur
You shade your eyes and scan the shore, hoping to spot a dinosaur in the forest. Unfortunately, you're too far away and moving too fast to make anything out clearly.

> x forest
The lush treeline almost glows with life in the bright sun. It wanders along, approaching the water's edge in spots along the shoreline. Although it's too far to be sure, you're pretty sure you can see the thick trunks of kauri among the forest trees.

> x kauri
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> x beach
The beach is a surprisingly dark black, which you've read is because of millenia of waves pounding against volcanic rock. It glitters with flashes of reflected sunlight as the cutter passes.

A shadow briefly passes over the cutter as the sun moves through the gathering clouds.

> x marsh
At intervals along the coast you can see a greenish fuzz that you guess must be some sort of marsh grass, where an outcrop or bay protects the shoreline from the tide.

You think you see something large moving on shore -- could it be a dinosaur? You wish your binoculars weren't stowed in your luggage.

> l
The Prow
The cutter 's hydrofoil brings the ship high out of the water -- high enough that there's very little spray. The wind whips past as the boat glides across the ocean off the coast to port. Thick, deep green bands of forest snake along the coastline to port. The treeline tracks stretches of black sand beach , sharp cliffs of dark volcanic rock, and the occasional salt marsh . The ocean glares as you look at the shore, almost overpoweringly blue.

A shadow briefly passes over the cutter as the sun moves through the gathering clouds.

> aft

The Stern
The stern of the cutter is well-organized and uncluttered; all of the stores and supplies are stashed below. The deck and guardrail are painted white, and are almost too bright to focus upon in the sun. A small door leads inside to the bridge, and a rectangular opening in the deck leads down a steep ladder into the hold.

White seabirds pace the cutter for a while, then wheel away.

> x deck
The deck is probably steel, like the rest of the ship, but it's covered with a white, non-slip surface.

> x rail
The guardrail is a thin tube of white-painted steel that rings the ship to prevent people from falling off.

> x door
A small, oval, painted-steel hatch that leads into the bridge.

A shadow briefly passes over the cutter as the sun moves through the gathering clouds.

> x opening
It's a fairly large, rectangular opening into the hold. You guess that it's probably as large as it is in order to handle loading and unloading large cargo crates. A steep ladder leads down into the hold.

White seabirds pace the cutter for a while, then wheel away.

> keywords

Aotearoa can make use of emphasized keywords to indicate objects you can interact with. It is recommended that your interpreter program correctly displays them with some form of emphasis, although it is not strictly required. Type a number below to cycle through display options until you find one that shows clearly on your system:

1) Emphasized object keywords currently look like this .
2) Emphasized
topic keywords currently look like this .

Press 0 when you're finished here.

Aotearoa can make use of emphasized keywords to indicate objects you can interact with. It is recommended that your interpreter program correctly displays them with some form of emphasis, although it is not strictly required. Type a number below to cycle through display options until you find one that shows clearly on your system:

1) Emphasized object keywords currently look like this .
2) Emphasized
topic keywords currently look like this .

**A warning: it may at times be useful to be able to differentiate between the various kinds of keyword.**

Press 0 when you're finished here.

Aotearoa can make use of emphasized keywords to indicate objects you can interact with. It is recommended that your interpreter program correctly displays them with some form of emphasis, although it is not strictly required. Type a number below to cycle through display options until you find one that shows clearly on your system:

1) Emphasized object keywords currently look like this .
2) Emphasized
topic keywords currently look like this .

Press 0 when you're finished here.

Aotearoa can make use of emphasized keywords to indicate objects you can interact with. It is recommended that your interpreter program correctly displays them with some form of emphasis, although it is not strictly required. Type a number below to cycle through display options until you find one that shows clearly on your system:

1) Emphasized object keywords currently look like this .
2) Emphasized
topic keywords currently look like this .

Press 0 when you're finished here.

Aotearoa can make use of emphasized keywords to indicate objects you can interact with. It is recommended that your interpreter program correctly displays them with some form of emphasis, although it is not strictly required. Type a number below to cycle through display options until you find one that shows clearly on your system:

1) Emphasized object keywords currently look like this .
2) Emphasized
topic keywords currently look like this .

Press 0 when you're finished here.

Aotearoa can make use of emphasized keywords to indicate objects you can interact with. It is recommended that your interpreter program correctly displays them with some form of emphasis, although it is not strictly required. Type a number below to cycle through display options until you find one that shows clearly on your system:

1) Emphasized object keywords currently look like this.
2) Emphasized
topic keywords currently look like this .

**This setting will effectively result in no keyword highlighting. Make sure this is what you want before saving this setting.**

Press 0 when you're finished here.

The Stern
The stern of the cutter is well-organized and uncluttered; all of the stores and supplies are stashed below. The deck and guardrail are painted white, and are almost too bright to focus upon in the sun. A small door leads inside to the bridge, and a rectangular opening in the deck leads down a steep ladder into the hold.

> in

The Bridge
The cutter's small bridge looks like it also serves as a living room and smoking lounge. The ship's controls are laid out on a cluttered panel to forward, under a wide, grimy window. A low side table stands by the door, food trash surrounding an overflowing, smoldering ashtray. A few chairs are scattered around as well. A door leads outside and a ladder leads down into the crew quarters.

The captain scratches his scalp unconsciously.

The captain acknowledges your arrival with a glance and a grunt, then turns back to his instruments. "Help yourself to a sandwich. I think there's one left."

> get sandwich
Taken.

> x it
You look closely at the sandwich and shrug. You can't tell how old it is, or even what it's made of. The bread is brown and it looks edible, at least in theory.

> eat it
You decide that you're hungry enough to confront the mystery of the sandwich head-on and take a bite. Surprisingly, it's tasty, and you make short work of the rest of it.

Something seems to bother the captain. He peers more closely at a control on the console, then mutters darkly to himself.

> x controls
The controls are labeled with unfamiliar abbreviations; you can't figure them out.

A sudden beeping from the radar attracts the captain's attention. He glances at the screen for a moment, then clicks his tongue.

> x window
Flat glass panes that sweep through almost half the bridge. The impressive view is dimmed by an accumulation of salt and grime.

> look through window
You can see the ocean ahead and to starboard, with the coast of Aotearoa to port. The view is definitely better from outside, despite the wind.

> s
Compass directions make no sense on board ship, but you can use starboard, port, fore, and aft instead.

> d
The captain waves you back. "Don't go down there, kid! The men are cleaning up an oil leak. Very messy!"

The radio erupts with a quick burst of staticky conversation, which the captain ignores. You can't make out a single word.

> out

The Stern
The stern of the cutter is well-organized and uncluttered; all of the stores and supplies are stashed below. The deck and guardrail are painted white, and are almost too bright to focus upon in the sun. A small door leads inside to the bridge, and a rectangular opening in the deck leads down a steep ladder into the hold.

You notice clouds gathering as you leave the bridge -- maybe there's a storm coming. As you take a few steps out onto the stern deck, you hear shouts from behind you. Almost immediately, the captain yells as well, calling you back. "Hey, you... Kid! Whatever your name was... Come back here! I've got a job for you."

A shadow briefly passes over the cutter as the sun moves through the gathering clouds.

> in

The Bridge
The cutter's small bridge looks like it also serves as a living room and smoking lounge. The ship's controls are laid out on a cluttered panel to forward, under a wide, grimy window. A low side table stands by the door, food trash surrounding an overflowing, smoldering ashtray. A few chairs are scattered around as well. A door leads outside and a ladder leads down into the crew quarters.

The captain taps his foot distractedly.

The captain half-turns towards you. "You! Make yourself useful and grab the hyperbolic torsion spanner from the hold. Those māhunga wai down there forgot it."

Something seems to bother the captain. He peers more closely at a control on the console, then mutters darkly to himself.

> talk to captain
You approach the captain a bit gingerly. "Excuse me, sir?"

He folds his arms and glowers at you. "I'll talk to you after you bring me the hyperbolic torsion spanner like I asked you. Not before."

The sounds of annoyed crewmen arguing in Māori rise from the lower deck.

> out

The Stern
The stern of the cutter is well-organized and uncluttered; all of the stores and supplies are stashed below. The deck and guardrail are painted white, gleaming in the alternating patches of sun and shade as the cutter passes under the gathering clouds. A small door leads inside to the bridge, and a rectangular opening in the deck leads down a steep ladder into the hold.

It doesn't seem quite so hot any more.

> d

The Hold
The hold's ceiling is frighteningly low, even for you. The space is cramped and hot, and the relentless, overpowering drone of the cutter's engine is almost unbearable here. The hold is mostly packed full of crates, probably containing supplies for the various Conservation Service camps in the Protected Lands. Near the stern there's a clear area with a pegboard mounted on the wall. The pegboard holds tools and supplies that the crew members use, and a ladder leads up.

Your school backpack leans against against one the crates, looking out of place.

The tools and equipment clatter as the cutter lurches a bit.

> x board
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> x pegboard
It's just a regular pegboard, used to hang and organize tools.

On the pegboard are a hyperbolic torsion spanner, a small pipe wrench, a large pipe wrench, a crescent wrench, a hacksaw, and an electric drill.

One of the crates shifts slightly, startling you.

> get spanner
Taken.

The tools and equipment clatter as the cutter lurches a bit.

> x it
An obscure tool that you apparently overlooked in your earlier looting. You have no idea what it does.

One of the crates shifts slightly, startling you.

> i
You are carrying:
a hyperbolic torsion spanner
a seabird feather

> save
Ok.

> u

The Stern
The stern of the cutter is well-organized and uncluttered; all of the stores and supplies are stashed below. The deck and guardrail are painted white, gleaming in the alternating patches of sun and shade as the cutter passes under the gathering clouds. A small door leads inside to the bridge, and a rectangular opening in the deck leads down a steep ladder into the hold.

You think you see something large moving on shore -- could it be a dinosaur? You wish your binoculars weren't stowed in your luggage.

> in

The Bridge
The cutter's small bridge looks like it also serves as a living room and smoking lounge. The ship's controls are laid out on a cluttered panel to forward, under a wide, grimy window. A low side table stands by the door, food trash surrounding an overflowing, smoldering ashtray. A few chairs are scattered around as well. A door leads outside and a ladder leads down into the crew quarters.

The captain scratches his scalp determinedly.

The captain turns and notices you holding the hyperbolic torsion spanner, and reaches to take it. "Thanks, son... Took you long enough, though." He then turns and yells down the ladder to the lower deck.

"Hey, māhunga wai ! Here's the hyperbolic torsion spanner!" He tosses it down the ladder. You hear a yelp of pain, followed by a clatter as the tool falls to the deck. The captain mutters, shakes his head, and returns to work.

Something seems to bother the captain. He peers more closely at a control on the console, then mutters darkly to himself.

> talk to captain
You try to capture the captain's attention. It's not easy. "Ah, sir? Can I talk to you for a minute?"

He responds while looking at the controls. "What do you need, kid?"

A sudden beeping from the radar attracts the captain's attention. He glances at the screen for a moment, then clicks his tongue.

(You could ask him about himself , the sandwich , Eruera , the coastal cutter , the dinosaurs , or Aotearoa .)

> ask him about eruera
"What do you know about Eruera?"

The captain turns to you. "Eruera? I don't know him well, except by reputation. He's supposed to be a quite a toa -- a warrior. Served in the ADF before transferring to the Conservation Service."

The captain checks the controls, then gives a grunt of apparent satisfaction.

> ask him about the cutter
"What kind of ship is this?" you ask.

The captain grimaces. "This decrepit old tub is the Whakamarumaru . It's an old hydrofoil design; one of the first they ever made. It's fast and maneuverable, but we have a devil of a time keeping it running."

> ask him about himself
(himself)
"Who are you?" you ask.

The captain responds. "I'm Captain Hunapo, the captain of the ANS Whakamarumaru ."

He grins as you try to mouth the name of the ship. "It means 'protector'."

Something seems to bother the captain. He peers more closely at a control on the console, then mutters darkly to himself.

> ask him about dinosaurs
"Have you ever seen one of the dinosaurs?" you ask.

The captain laughs. "'Have I seen a big one?', of course you mean. The taniwha are not as common as the television documentaries would have you believe, tama . But yes, I've seen several of the horned ones. Even though they are plant-eaters, they are still fearsome."

A sudden beeping from the radar attracts the captain's attention. He glances at the screen for a moment, then clicks his tongue.

> out
As you turn away, the captain shakes his head, mutters something you can't understand, and turns back to the controls.

The Stern
The stern of the cutter is well-organized and uncluttered; all of the stores and supplies are stashed below. The deck and guardrail are painted white, helping you to see them under the shade of the gathering storm clouds. A small door leads inside to the bridge, and a rectangular opening in the deck leads down a steep ladder into the hold.

A shadow briefly passes over the cutter as the sun moves through the gathering clouds.

> d

The Hold
The hold's ceiling is frighteningly low, even for you. The space is cramped and hot, and the relentless, overpowering drone of the cutter's engine is almost unbearable here. The hold is mostly packed full of crates, probably containing supplies for the various Conservation Service camps in the Protected Lands. Near the stern there's a clear area with a pegboard mounted on the wall. The pegboard holds tools and supplies that the crew members use, and a ladder leads up.

Your school backpack leans against against one the crates, looking out of place.

The tools and equipment clatter as the cutter lurches a bit.

> get backpack
Taken.

One of the crates shifts slightly, startling you.

> look in it
In the backpack are your acceptance letter, your passport, your lucky rabbit's foot, your photographs, and Aotearoa 4 Kids!.

The tools and equipment clatter as the cutter lurches a bit.

> x letter
A copy of the letter from the Aotearoa Conservation Service informing you that you've been selected for the Junior Fieldwork Program. Who knew writing an essay about "What Conservation Means to Me" would lead to this? Only 100 kids total per year from all over the world get chosen, and you were one of them! Of course, you're also the only one that missed his connecting flight and has to catch up with the rest, too...

The hot, humid atmosphere of the hold is almost overpowering.

> x passport
Your parents got you that passport when they took you to England for your cousin Trish's wedding. You almost wish you hadn't had to drag it out of the box. It always reminds you of the time you pulled it out of your pocket at the arrivals counter the same way Dad did, and the way everyone laughed, even the customs agents.

> x foot
Aunt Janet says it's silly, and she didn't want you to take it. "What would those Program people think if they saw it?"

But the rabbit's foot has always kept you safe, and you weren't about to leave it behind when you were going halfway across the world, no matter what she said. No way.

> x photos
You spend a minute looking at a picture of you, your Mom, and your Dad posing in front of the dinosaur exhibit at the university's museum. The memories return, sharp and clear. The museum trip was one of the main reasons you entered the competition. Mom and Dad had always talked about going on a trip to Aotearoa someday -- it seemed like something they would have been proud of you for doing. But you wish they were here now to make you feel a little less afraid of going.

> x kids
Your teacher, Mrs. Casmer, gave you this reference book about Aotearoa when your acceptance letter came in. She was really proud of you. The book is huge -- at least 400 pages -- and covers everything from history and politics to geography and wildlife. You've probably read it all the way through five times by now, trying to prepare yourself for this trip. You leaf through the familiar pages a bit distractedly, refreshing your memory a bit about the changes in the divorce rate over time.

I like the numbering of options — haven't seen this done before.

> x tools
Which do you mean, the 1) small pipe wrench, the 2) large pipe wrench, the 3) crescent wrench, the 4) hacksaw, or the 5) electric drill?

> 1
(the small pipe wrench)
A smaller size of pipe wrench. It's a bit dirty and rusty, but otherwise looks fine.

The tools and equipment clatter as the cutter lurches a bit.

> x 2
A larger size of pipe wrench. The long handle and weighty head make this look pretty awkward to carry.

> x 3
A good-sized adjustable crescent wrench. It's covered in some sort of grease or oil.

> x 4
A hacksaw as long as your forearm, with a wickedly sharp blade.

The hot, humid atmosphere of the hold is almost overpowering.

> x 5
A heavy-duty, battery-powered electric drill, with a pack of bits and a chock attached to it with a rubber strap. It looks like it's seen heavy use over a long time.

> i
You are carrying:
a backpack (open)
your acceptance letter
your passport
your lucky rabbit's foot
your photographs
Aotearoa 4 Kids
a seabird feather

> l
The Hold
The hold's ceiling is frighteningly low, even for you. The space is cramped and hot, and the relentless, overpowering drone of the cutter's engine is almost unbearable here. The hold is mostly packed full of crates, probably containing supplies for the various Conservation Service camps in the Protected Lands. Near the stern there's a clear area with a pegboard mounted on the wall. The pegboard holds tools and supplies that the crew members use, and a ladder leads up.

One of the crates shifts slightly, startling you.

> fore
Crates and solid metal walls block you.

> x crates
The wooden crates are stacked in rough order and held down with wide canvas straps. They come in several different sizes, but most appear to be cubes and measure around four or five feet on a side.

> open crate
The crates are held down with straps and can't be opened.

> u

The Stern
The stern of the cutter is well-organized and uncluttered; all of the stores and supplies are stashed below. The deck and guardrail are painted white, helping you to see them under the shade of the gathering storm clouds. A small door leads inside to the bridge, and a rectangular opening in the deck leads down a steep ladder into the hold.

It doesn't seem quite so hot any more.

> x clouds
A thick carpet of stormclouds covers the sky from horizon to horizon, shutting away the sun. Lightning flashes intermittently, like an orchestra tuning up for a performance.
.

You think you see something large moving on shore -- could it be a dinosaur? You wish your binoculars weren't stowed in your luggage.

> save
Ok.

> fore

The Prow
The cutter's hydrofoil brings the ship high out of the water -- high enough that there's very little spray. The wind whips past as the boat glides across the ocean off the coast to port. Gathering clouds dim the light, almost hiding the dark green bands of thick forest snaking along the coastline's inky beach and charcoal cliffs to port.

> x cliffs
The cliffs are tall and somehow threatening in the gloom. You can hardly make out any details in the deepening darkness.

> aft

The Stern
The stern of the cutter is well-organized and uncluttered; all of the stores and supplies are stashed below. The deck and guardrail are painted white, helping you to see them under the shade of the gathering storm clouds. A small door leads inside to the bridge, and a rectangular opening in the deck leads down a steep ladder into the hold.

> in

The Bridge
The cutter's small bridge looks like it also serves as a living room and smoking lounge. The ship's controls are laid out on a cluttered panel to forward, under a wide, grimy window. A low side table stands by the door, food trash surrounding an overflowing, smoldering ashtray. A few chairs are scattered around as well. A door leads outside and a ladder leads down into the crew quarters.

The captain taps his foot distractedly.

> talk to captain
You approach the captain a bit gingerly. "Excuse me, sir?"

"What do you want, boy?"

The captain checks the controls, then gives a grunt of apparent satisfaction.

(You could ask him about himself , the sandwich , Eruera , the coastal cutter , the dinosaurs , or Aotearoa .)

> ask him about aotearoa
(Aotearoa)
"Sir," you ask, "what can you tell me about Aotearoa? I've never been here before."

"Well, that's obvious, tama ." He smiles, then starts talking, gesturing expansively with his hands.

If dinosaurs still existed, would the word "dinosaurs" still be commonly used? Maybe they would just be thought of as wild animals, and "dinosaurs" would be a semi-scientific term like "marsupials" or "herbivores".

"Aotearoa -- 'The Land of the Long Cloud'! You're just offshore of the closest place to Paradise on the face of the Earth, kid. The one place the British couldn't conquer when they were colonizing the world -- we Māori toa fought them to a standstill and they settled for an alliance as equals."

He laughs as he continues, "Even the giant meteor that killed the dinosaurs all over the world couldn't defeat the taniwha of Aotearoa! All the dinosaurs left in the world live right here." He sweeps his hands to indicate the coastline moving past outside the window, then turns back to the controls.

> seriously you want to me type take a salt marsh
You typed a rather long command and I didn't understand it. It's better to stick to simpler things like TAKE SOME CLIFFS.

> take some cliffs
You can't take that since you can't even reach it.

A sudden beeping from the radar attracts the captain's attention. He glances at the screen for a moment, then clicks his tongue.

> read book
Your teacher, Mrs. Casmer, gave you this reference book about Aotearoa when your acceptance letter came in. She was really proud of you. The book is huge -- at least 400 pages -- and covers everything from history and politics to geography and wildlife. You've probably read it all the way through five times by now, trying to prepare yourself for this trip. You leaf through the familiar pages a bit distractedly, refreshing your memory a bit about famous debates in the National Assembly's lower house.

The captain checks the controls, then gives a grunt of apparent satisfaction.

> i
You are carrying:
a backpack (open)
your acceptance letter
your passport
your lucky rabbit's foot
your photographs
Aotearoa 4 Kids
a seabird feather

Something's wrong with this rabbit's foot.

> rub rabbit's foot
You can't see anything by that name here.

> rub foot
You achieve nothing by this.

> x rabbit's foot
That noun did not make sense in this context.

I'm not sure what I'm supposed to be doing at this point.

> sleep
You're not tired.

The sounds of annoyed crewmen arguing in Māori rise from the lower deck.

> d
The captain sighs. "Seriously, kid. Very messy, very dangerous. Stay on deck or in here, please."

Something seems to bother the captain. He peers more closely at a control on the console, then mutters darkly to himself.

> talk to captain
You are already talking to the captain.

The captain checks the controls, then gives a grunt of apparent satisfaction.

> topics
You could ask him about himself , the sandwich , Eruera , the coastal cutter , the dinosaurs , or Aotearoa .

> l
The Bridge
The cutter's small bridge looks like it also serves as a living room and smoking lounge. The ship's controls are laid out on a cluttered panel to forward, under a wide, grimy window. A low side table stands by the door, food trash surrounding an overflowing, smoldering ashtray. A few chairs are scattered around as well. A door leads outside and a ladder leads down into the crew quarters.

The captain scratches his scalp distractedly.

> look under table
You find nothing of interest.

> s
Compass directions make no sense on board ship, but you can use starboard, port, fore, and aft instead.

The sounds of annoyed crewmen arguing in Māori rise from the lower deck.

Which wall is the door in here?

> aft
There are solid bulkheads in that direction.

The radio erupts with a quick burst of staticky conversation, which the captain ignores. You can't make out a single word.

> fore
The controls and window are in the way.

Something seems to bother the captain. He peers more closely at a control on the console, then mutters darkly to himself.

> port
There are solid bulkheads in that direction.

> starboard
There are solid bulkheads in that direction.

The radio erupts with a quick burst of staticky conversation, which the captain ignores. You can't make out a single word.

> out
As you poke your head out the bridge door, you notice the clouds have thickened quickly -- it's now quite dark, except for brief, dim sparks of internal lightning that flicker deep within the clouds. Eruera pops his head up from the staircase. "Is that you, Tim? Hold on a second..." He looks down and waves someone on, then turns back to you. "Good! I think we are almost done here -- I will meet you on the prow when we are finished. That will keep you a bit more out of the way while we test whether the repair will hold under pressure." He vanishes back down the ladder.

> for
You either used a verb or keyword I don't recognize, or used it in a way that I can't understand.

> fore
The controls and window are in the way.

A sudden beeping from the radar attracts the captain's attention. He glances at the screen for a moment, then clicks his tongue.

> out
As you turn away, the captain shakes his head, mutters something you can't understand, and turns back to the controls.

The Stern
The stern of the cutter is well-organized and uncluttered; all of the stores and supplies are stashed below. The deck and guardrail are painted white, helping you to see them under the shade of the gathering storm clouds. A small door leads inside to the bridge, and a rectangular opening in the deck leads down a steep ladder into the hold.

> fore

The Prow
The cutter's hydrofoil brings the ship high out of the water -- high enough that there's very little spray. The wind whips past as the boat glides across the ocean off the coast to port. Gathering clouds dim the light, almost hiding the dark green bands of thick forest snaking along the coastline's inky beach and charcoal cliffs to port.

You spend a couple of minutes looking out over the ocean, watching the waves rise as dim lightning glows in the depths of the stormclouds and distant booms of thunder shake the air. It's a breathtaking scene, and for a moment you don't notice Eruera pushing through the wind from aft to stand beside you. He watches the approaching storm in silence with you for a moment as the light dims. "It looks like quite an āwhā coming our way. Perhaps you should come back in to the bridge before it hits. I would hate for you to get soaked and miserable before we even get to camp."

You consider it as the sky darkens further. It's not a bad idea. But as you start to agree, Eruera snaps his head up, startled by something in the distance to port, and cuts you off with a raised hand. "Tim, did you see..."

Without warning, he seizes you in a powerful grip! In one smooth motion he wrenches you off of your feet and pitches you over the starboard railing, so quickly you don't even have time for a scream before you're tumbling towards the sea, arms pinwheeling. Just before you hit the water you catch a single brief glimpse of Eruera poised to leap, one hand on the railing and a wide-eyed look of panic on his face. Then you plunge into the ocean with a stinging jolt, seawater jetting up your nose and your limbs painfully forced into unnatural positions by the water's drag.

As you tumble and slow, there's a terribly loud crash of thunder. You flounder, stunned, trying to remember your swimming survival lessons. By the time you orient yourself and manage to look around, it's all over. But everything has changed. The cutter is half-submerged and leaning way over on its side, a huge, ragged hole punched in its port side near the stern. Twisted pieces of deck and the remains of crates are strewn over the ocean, visible in brief peeks over the rolling waves.

But even though the panic rises up and your breathing is shallow and fast, you know you have to stay afloat. You start paddling toward the ship, but before you can cover even half the distance it has sunk low in the water and you realize there's no point -- it will be gone before you can reach it.

You tread water for a moment as you look around, thrashing your legs wildly to keep your head above water and continuing to force down the panic. It seems you've gotten turned around somehow -- which way was the coast?

Please press SPACE to continue.

In the Ocean
You are treading water alone in the ocean as a sudden summer storm drenches your face with sheets of rain. Lightning flashes and sledgehammers of thunder batter your ears as you try to get your bearings. The slightly acrid taste of engine oil mixed with seawater seeps into your mouth and makes you want to constantly spit; the bad taste and the floating debris are the only reminders that there was a ship with a living crew skimming over this water just minutes ago. The rise and fall of the ocean waves all around you limit how far you can see, and the storm blocks out the summer sun like an eclipse.

In the confusion, you lose your grip on what you were holding, and everything is swept away in the fury of the storm.

Something bumps you from below. You thrash away from it, wasting energy. You're not sure if you moved very far, but whatever it was is apparently gone. At least, it isn't bothering you at the moment.

> save
Ok.

> x debris
Blown about at random in the storm are bits and broken pieces of the cutter, mostly unrecognizable. The blast must have done a lot of internal damage as well as what it did to the outside of the ship.

As you rise to the top of a wave, you catch a glimpse of something dark floating in the water nearby, but it's gone before you can make out what it was.

> x thing
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> x glimpse
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> dive
You either used a verb or keyword I don't recognize, or used it in a way that I can't understand.

> s
You have no choice; you have to try to get to shore. You kick, aiming in the direction you think might be correct. After several minutes of swimming, however, you don't notice any difference in your surroundings, and you're not even sure you're going the same direction you were headed when you started out.

Something bumps you from below. You thrash away from it, wasting energy. You're not sure if you moved very far, but whatever it was is apparently gone. At least, it isn't bothering you at the moment.

Something oddly-shaped attracts your notice as it approaches you. It looks vaguely like a board.

> get board
You swim over to the board with high hopes, intending to use it as a life preserver. At first, it seems like it's going to work, but as you put more of your weight on it an unexpected wave puts too much stress on it and it splits along its cracks.

You're very cold. It's getting harder to make your hands do what you want.

> x stars
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> x sky
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> x clouds
You aren't sure where the clouds is at the moment.

> x board
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> i
You are carrying nothing.

You can't help wondering whether you're going to live through this. You fight down a rising sense of panic.

> scream
You either used a verb or keyword I don't recognize, or used it in a way that I can't understand.

> s
Once again, you decide on a direction and start swimming, hoping to reach land. Or at least sight it. But again the minutes pass and you can't see any change in your surroundings. You stop, filled with exhaustion and despair.

> undress
You either used a verb or keyword I don't recognize, or used it in a way that I can't understand.

> remove clothes
You can't see anything by that name here.

> x crates
The last time you saw them, the supply crates were at The Hold.

Thunder crashes as the storm rolls on.

> swim
To swim, you should specify to where you are swimming: SWIM TO BOAT or something similar.

> swim to board
You can't see anything by that name here.

> swim to boat
You can't see anything by that name here.

> swim to coast
You can't see anything by that name here.

> l
In the Ocean
You are treading water alone in the ocean as a sudden summer storm drenches your face with sheets of rain. Lightning flashes and sledgehammers of thunder batter your ears as you try to get your bearings. The slightly acrid taste of engine oil mixed with seawater seeps into your mouth and makes you want to constantly spit; the bad taste and the floating debris are the only reminders that there was a ship with a living crew skimming over this water just minutes ago. The rise and fall of the ocean waves all around you limit how far you can see, and the storm blocks out the summer sun like an eclipse.

You see something at the limit of your vision -- something that looks like a floating crate. You hear your father's voice calling to you out of the storm. " Tim! This way! Swim to the crate! "

But he's... it just can't be!

You seem to hear a voice crying out, but you can't tell whether it's real or simply a trick of the wind before it's gone.

> swim to crate
" Tim, over here! " The call is clearer this time. It's definitely Dad, and you don't spare any more effort wondering whether it's possible or not.

"Dad!" Fatigue is forgotten as you flail through the water towards your father. He's hanging on to one of the crates from the cutter -- this one miraculously intact -- that floats nearby, and he beckons you anxiously with his free hand.

You draw near -- the crate is very close, but you're so tired, and you think you might not make it, and then your father's voice rings clearly in your ears over the shrieks of the other kids at the pool...

Shallow End
You're standing in the warm water of the shallow end of the George Ross Community Center pool, five years old once more. The pool is indoors, so the the excited shouting and shrieking from all the other kids echo back and forth into a neverending high-pitched background noise. The air is thick with humidity and the itchy smell of chlorine.

Dad is crouching in the water, just a step or two beyond where the bottom of the pool starts to slope down into the deep end. His arms are outstretched, and there's an excited smile on his face. "You can do it, Tim! Just like I showed you!" You're pretty scared, and really tired from all the swimming and playing earlier in the day, but maybe you can do this after all...

> swim to dad
You start towards Dad, but it's too scary and you flail backwards to the safety of the shallow end, spluttering as cold, yucky-tasting water floods your mouth and nose.

Cold?

"Good try, Tim! You were doing it! Try once more and you'll make it!"

> g
You try to work up your courage for another attempt, but the memory of slipping underwater is too frightening. You're about to call out to Dad and tell him you can't do it, when you see a young dark-skinned boy about your age wade out to the drop-off. Who is he? He looks very familiar, but you know he's not in your kindergarten class. Maybe one of the other classes...

He turns to look directly at you, and something about the look in his eyes gives you a calm sense of confidence. He turns away, crouches, pushes with his legs, and he's off, a fish flitting to the far end of the pool without a backwards glance.

As you watch him, you can feel a new determination -- if that boy can do it, you can too. You turn, look at Dad, crouch down, and push forward, kicking your tired legs with new strength and moving your arms the right way -- you think it's the right way, at least. You keep going, trying to remember to breathe properly, until your hand pokes into Dad's stomach and he pulls you up out of the water with a huge smile on his face. He twirls you around, shouting "You did it! You did it!" as he gathers you into a great big hug...

Please press SPACE to continue.

" I pai ai ! You're alive!" Somehow you're hanging onto the crate near Eruera. Of course it couldn't have been Dad; what were you thinking? Something's wrong, though. Eruera winces as he shifts his grip on the crate, breath hissing and eyes narrowing. Then it passes, and he continues, shouting to be heard over the raging storm.

"We may be alive, Tim, but we won't stay alive unless we can get to shore. And I think I broke my leg when the missile hit -- I was almost over the railing, but not quite. I felt my left leg crunch below the knee, and it hurts very badly to move it at all, let alone kick." He smiles almost apologetically. "I don't know how much help I'm going to be moving this thing."

Missile? Was that what sank the ship?

In the Ocean
You are floating holding onto a crate in what seems like the dead center of the storm. Eruera is beside you, grimacing with pain and taking shallow breaths as he holds on as well. The wind shoves the crate around where it will, dragging you along in its wake. You might be able to influence its direction, but your legs are really tired and you're not sure you have the strength.

You're very cold. It's getting harder to make your hands do what you want.

> save
Ok.

There's a lot of reading to get through here.

> s
"Hold on," you yell to Eruera over the howling of the wind. You can't really muster up much hope that you'll make it to shore, but at least you've got something to cling to, and you're not alone. That's way, way better than where you were a couple of minutes ago. You start kicking, trying to push the crate in a direction -- any direction. You can't tell whether you're making any progress. Eruera tries to encourage you, but his words are cut apart by the storm and garbled by your own exhaustion, and you can't make sense of what he's saying.

You keep kicking until your legs fail. You rest, then try again, a cycle that gets shorter and shorter as you slowly run out of energy. All of a sudden, an unexpectedly violent surge of the sea tears you loose from the crate, and in a strange calm you briefly slip under the waves before kicking upwards again with leaden feet. By the time you reorient yourself, the crate is out of reach, scudding just ahead of you before the wind. It's so close... but you have nothing left in your legs, and you can't quite reach Eruera's arm as he stretches out towards you. Slowly, unstoppably, the distance increases, carrying the crate into the dark and leaving you behind. The last thing you see is Eruera straining toward you, trying to yell something over the fury of the storm. But the thunder, wind, and rain drown his voice and he finally disappears into the gloom.

Please press SPACE to continue.

Alive...

You must be alive -- you feel too miserable to be dead. Despite your aching leg muscles and the burning sensation in your lungs you'd rather stay unconscious -- if it weren't for the surf slapping your face every few seconds, making you choke and splutter. Very reluctantly, you shove yourself up the beach a bit farther to get away from the tide. After what seems like another hour, you open your stinging eyes and look around. You're on a strand of black sand in a shallow bay, and the lying sky is now innocent blue and filled with harmless-looking, puffy clouds.

Strand
You stand on a thin strip of black sand lining the shallow curve of a bay to the east. A few seabirds fly overhead, and various clumps of driftwood, seaweed, and other shore debris litter the shore, the only visible evidence of the recent storm. A steep tumble of volcanic rock looms over the beach to the west and south, blocking travel in all directions except into the forest to the north.

You slowly stagger to your feet, your battered body and abused muscles protesting all the while. You look around with a dull stare, not really understanding yet what you're seeing and unsure what to make of the black beach you stand upon. You wonder what happened to Eruera.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> save
Ok.

> x debris
You start to pick through the pile of junk, and suddenly realize there's a body buried beneath! It's lying still, but you can just barely see its chest rise and fall. Moving as carefully as you can, you remove the splintered boards and assorted wreckage, until you expose the face. It's Eruera!

The jostling of debris disturbs him, and his eyes slowly open, flakes of dried salt falling from his eyelids. You can't bear to look at his face -- he's in too much agony. It takes a long minute before he becomes aware enough of his surroundings to recognize you.

"Tim, is that you?" he croaks. "I guess we made it."

He doesn't smile, barely even sounds interested. It's obvious he's going to need help quickly.

> move debris
It is fixed in place.

> x eruera
Eruera looks pretty bad -- he's soaked with seawater and moaning in pain, and not really fully aware. Despite everything, he's still desperately holding on to what you recognize as one of the broken boards from the crate. His left leg in particular looks really painful -- it doesn't seem to be as straight as it should, and it's swollen to almost grotesque size.

> i
You are carrying nothing.

> search debris
You pick through the pile of debris a bit more, but find nothing else useful or interesting.

> x driftwood
You pick through the piles of driftwood. One stick looks both straight and strong, and you set it aside.

> x seaweed
You sift through the slimy plants but find nothing.

> get seaweed
That's hardly portable.

> talk to eruera
You approach Eruera where he lies near the pile of debris. "Eruera, it's me, Tim! How can I help you?"

He groans in pain. "Need... a splint..."

> give stick to eruera
(first taking the stick)
You get Eruera's attention, waving the stick.

"Well, I found this stick," you say, holding it out so he can see. "No... too small. Need something heavier... And something... tie with..."

> give seaweed to eruera
(first taking the seaweed)
That's hardly portable.

> l
Strand
You stand on a thin strip of black sand lining the shallow curve of a bay to the east. A few seabirds fly overhead, and various clumps of driftwood, seaweed, and other shore debris litter the shore, the only visible evidence of the recent storm. A steep tumble of volcanic rock looms over the beach to the west and south, blocking travel in all directions except into the forest to the north.

Eruera, looking almost brutalized and making feeble noises of pain, lies near the wreckage of the cargo crate.

The ocean apparently didn't deliver everything safely to the beach. Several broken boards are among the smaller debris, apparently the remnants of a cargo crate that didn't survive the explosion or storm.

> x boards
A broken piece of wood from a crate, still sturdy but manageable to carry.

> get it
Taken.

> give it to eruera
You move so Eruera can see you, holding the bulky board out for his inspection.

"Well, I found this board," you say, holding it out so he can see. "And there are some more over in the pile. Will these work?"

"Yes... should work fine. Need something... to tie them..."

> n

North Strand
The black sand beach transitions to stones and boulders here as the seashore lifts into the black cliffs. To the northwest a break in the volcanic stone leads upwards and into the depths of the forest. Where the water eddies at the north end of the beach a collection of light, floating junk has collected.

A green plastic bucket is washed up on shore here.

> get bucket
Taken.

> search junk
As you approach the floating junk, you notice a few interesting things. There are some shredded pieces of rope tangled around some crate splinters and seaweed, and a crumpled wad of what looks to be a ripped piece of tent fabric bobs here as well.

> get rope
The remains of the rope are soggy and useless, and you end up just giving up and dropping the slimy shreds back onto the beach.

> get fabric
Taken.

> x it
A long strip of thick tent fabric. Despite the abuse it's suffered, it seems tough.

> s

Strand
You stand on a thin strip of black sand lining the shallow curve of a bay to the east. A few seabirds fly overhead, and various clumps of driftwood, seaweed, and other shore debris litter the shore, the only visible evidence of the recent storm. A steep tumble of volcanic rock looms over the beach to the west and south, blocking travel in all directions except into the forest to the north.

Eruera, looking almost brutalized and making feeble noises of pain, lies near the wreckage of the cargo crate.

> give fabric to eruera
You approach Eruera and step in front of him, holding the destroyed tent out for his inspection.

"Eruera, I've got the board", you say. "I also found this piece of tent fabric. Seems pretty strong to me. Will these work?"

Eruera nods quickly. "Those... should work."

He rallies and becomes a bit more coherent, speaking with forced precision. "Tim, I think my left leg is badly broken. It needs to be straightened. I'll brace myself; you pull my leg straight toward you as hard as you can. After that you can splint it."

> pull leg
Eruera braces himself, and you hesitate just a moment before taking a firm grip on his ankle. Trying not to think about it, you pull as hard as you can, throwing your weight into extending his leg as Eruera screams in pain. Just when you're sure you're not strong enough -- that this was all for nothing -- you feel his leg shift. Eruera lets out such a piercing shriek of agony that you let go of his leg in surprise, falling backwards onto the wet sand. But when you struggle back up, you see that Eruera's leg looks like it's straight again. Still horribly swollen, but straight.

Eruera himself lies flat on his back, panting in exhaustion. "Good... Good job, Tim... Tēnā koe ..."

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> score
You have so far scored 2 out of a possible 12, in 121 turns.

> save
Ok.

> talk to eruera
"Eruera, I've got the board", you say. "And I've got the tent fabric too! Are we ready?"

He nods quickly. "Get three more... bring them here. Need to... splint my leg..."

> get boards
You already have that.

> i
You are carrying:
a destroyed tent
a leaky bucket, currently empty
a broken board
a stick

> drop board
Dropped.

> drop tent
Dropped.

> l
Strand
You stand on a thin strip of black sand lining the shallow curve of a bay to the east. A few seabirds fly overhead, and various clumps of driftwood, seaweed, and other shore debris litter the shore, the only visible evidence of the recent storm. A steep tumble of volcanic rock looms over the beach to the west and south, blocking travel in all directions except into the forest to the north.

Eruera, looking almost brutalized and making feeble noises of pain, lies near the wreckage of the cargo crate.

You can also see a destroyed tent and a broken board here.

> x crate
You can't see that any more.

> x driftwood
You pick through the piles of driftwood again but nothing else catches your eye.

> n

North Strand
The black sand beach transitions to stones and boulders here as the seashore lifts into the black cliffs. To the northwest a break in the volcanic stone leads upwards and into the depths of the forest. Where the water eddies at the north end of the beach a collection of light, floating junk has collected.

Shreds of what used to be a thick rope are here, washed up on the rocks at the north end of the beach and coated in black sand grains.

> get boards
The last time you saw it, the broken board was at Strand.

> s

Strand
You stand on a thin strip of black sand lining the shallow curve of a bay to the east. A few seabirds fly overhead, and various clumps of driftwood, seaweed, and other shore debris litter the shore, the only visible evidence of the recent storm. A steep tumble of volcanic rock looms over the beach to the west and south, blocking travel in all directions except into the forest to the north.

Eruera, looking almost brutalized and making feeble noises of pain, lies near the wreckage of the cargo crate.

You can also see a destroyed tent and a broken board here.

> splint leg
You seem not to have both the board and tent fragment handy any more.

> get board and tent
broken board: Taken.

destroyed tent: Taken.

I was told to get three more boards but apparently I didn't need to?

> splint leg
Working quickly, you brace Eruera's leg with the wood, tying the splint securely with scraps of tent fabric. Eruera hisses in pain as you pull, but also nods a quick jerk of approval through clenched teeth. You finish the knot.

Eruera tests the splint -- gingerly at first, but with more confidence as he sees how it holds up. "Good work, Tim!"

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> save
Ok.

> l
Strand
You stand on a thin strip of black sand lining the shallow curve of a bay to the east. A few seabirds fly overhead, and various clumps of driftwood, seaweed, and other shore debris litter the shore, the only visible evidence of the recent storm. A steep tumble of volcanic rock looms over the beach to the west and south, blocking travel in all directions except into the forest to the north.

Eruera lies on the sand here, alert but unable to move.

> talk to eruera
You walk up to Eruera as he lies on the beach. "Eruera, is there anything else you need?"

"Please, Tim. I'm so thirsty I can barely think. Please bring me some water first and then we can talk."

You take stock of your possessions and realize you don't have anything suitable. "OK, Eruera. I'll try to find something."

> n

North Strand
The black sand beach transitions to stones and boulders here as the seashore lifts into the black cliffs. To the northwest a break in the volcanic stone leads upwards and into the depths of the forest. Where the water eddies at the north end of the beach a collection of light, floating junk has collected.

Shreds of what used to be a thick rope are here, washed up on the rocks at the north end of the beach and coated in black sand grains.

> n
Steep black rocks block your path in that direction. It doesn't look like you'd be able to climb them.

> x junk
You sift through the junk carefully, but you've already picked out the only items that would likely be useful.

> nw

Forest Edge
Low bushy ferns give way to towering kauri trees here. Their delicate cones and thin, green leaves cast deeper shadows as the forest thickens to the northeast. A steep break in the cliff rock here leads southeast, down to the beach, and a faint animal trail leads into the forest to the northeast.

> ne

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

A small dinosaur, which stands no taller than your shin, is nearby. She stares at you with intense, beady eyes, tensed to spring away.

Would it be called an "oviraptor" if it wasn't extinct? I suppose you do get some scientific names in common use, like "hippopotamus" and "rhinoceros", but those are the only ones I can think of. Wouldn't people have adopted the Maori name for an oviraptor?

I suppose we have to allow this because it makes it easier for the player to understand that it's actually a dinosaur, and to look it up on the internet. Fair enough.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that the female oviraptor is using as a nest.

[ You've encountered an animal that may figure significantly in the story! This story gives you the ability to name such animals with the command NAME FEMALE OVIRAPTOR BOOPSIE (or any other name of your choice). When you do this, the game will use your new name for the animal in descriptions, and you can use that name in your commands as well. Try it! ]

> x dinosaur
The female oviraptor stands on her hind legs, her tiny head and sharp teeth about knee-high. Her front arms are short and clawed, making her look like a very miniature T-Rex, except for a smaller, almost birdlike head, and she has muted and dappled green and brown skin that makes her very hard to pick out of the undergrowth. She eyes you warily, unsure whether you're dangerous or not.

[ You've encountered an animal that may figure significantly in the story! This story gives you the ability to name such animals with the command NAME FEMALE OVIRAPTOR BOOPSIE (or any other name of your choice). When you do this, the game will use your new name for the animal in descriptions, and you can use that name in your commands as well. Try it! ]

> name female oviraptor Olive The Magic Oviraptor
[ Great! Now you can refer to the animal using your new name rather than its generic description. If you dislike the name, you can use the NAME command again to change it, or use UNNAME to remove it and revert to the generic description. ]

You address the female oviraptor. "I'm going to call you 'Olive The Magic Oviraptor'."

Pedant bait: disinterested.

Olive The Magic Oviraptor seems utterly disinterested.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> talk to olive
You can't see anything by that name here.

> talk to olive the magic oviraptor
You speak, but Olive The Magic Oviraptor doesn't respond.

> get battery
Olive The Magic Oviraptor steps forward, lets out a violent hiss, and glares at you in rage as you approach her nest. You retreat empty-handed, not wanting to get bitten.

> ne

Top of Falls
Here a mountain stream reaches the headwall and plunges over. The water falls forty feet or so, splattering off a black rock ledge below before reforming and flowing into the ocean. The cliff is too sheer to descend on this side, but you can see that there's a rockfall just past the north bank that you might be able to scramble down -- if you could get to it.

> fill bucket
You dunk the bucket into the stream, and pull it up brimming with fresh water.

The water in the bucket drips away as the level slowly falls.

> sw

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

Olive The Magic Oviraptor, who stands no taller than your shin, is nearby. She slowly moves from tree to tree, searching for something while always managing to keep you in view.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that Olive The Magic Oviraptor is using as a nest.

A thin stream of water drips to the ground as water leaks from the bucket.

> sw

Forest Edge
Low bushy ferns give way to towering kauri trees here. Their delicate cones and thin, green leaves cast deeper shadows as the forest thickens to the northeast. A steep break in the cliff rock here leads southeast, down to the beach, and a faint animal trail leads into the forest to the northeast.

The water level in the bucket drops as the contents leak away.

> se

North Strand
The black sand beach transitions to stones and boulders here as the seashore lifts into the black cliffs. To the northwest a break in the volcanic stone leads upwards and into the depths of the forest. Where the water eddies at the north end of the beach a collection of light, floating junk has collected.

Shreds of what used to be a thick rope are here, washed up on the rocks at the north end of the beach and coated in black sand grains.

The water in the bucket drips away as the level slowly falls.

> s

Strand
You stand on a thin strip of black sand lining the shallow curve of a bay to the east. A few seabirds fly overhead, and various clumps of driftwood, seaweed, and other shore debris litter the shore, the only visible evidence of the recent storm. A steep tumble of volcanic rock looms over the beach to the west and south, blocking travel in all directions except into the forest to the north.

Eruera lies on the sand here, alert but unable to move.

The water level in the bucket drops as the contents leak away.

> give water to eruera
(the fresh water to Eruera)
You approach Eruera where he lies near the pile of debris.

"Eruera! I've got water for you!

You hold out the bucket. "Here's some water, Eruera."

Eruera sits up laboriously, takes the bucket from you, and tips it into his mouth. Water spills over his face as he drinks, and he closes his eyes in bliss. What seems like minutes later, he lowers the bucket. "Thank you, Tim. That's much better!"

He gathers strength for a minute, panting for air a bit after downing the water. Finally he beckons you closer. "Tim, I'm sure the cutter was attacked, and I'm pretty certain it was by poachers -- criminals who illegally sneak ashore to capture the taniwha and sell them abroad. I'm not completely certain where we are at the moment, but if I'm right there should be a Conservation Service station about thirty miles to the north."

He grins and spreads his hands. "Obviously I'm in no shape for such a trip through the bush, so it is going to fall to you to get to that station and get us some help. I'll try to answer any questions you have, and if you encounter anything unusual in the area you can always ask me about it."

He steels himself, then twists, reaches into the pile of debris, and pulls out a solid-looking metal case. A huge smile spreads over his face. "By blind luck, that crate we stumbled across in the ocean had a set of field radios in it. They were in a sealed case, and they're pretty rugged, so they should still work." He hands you one of the radios and shows you how to push the button to make a call. You try it out, and the radio works perfectly! "With these we should be able to keep in touch in the field! If you run into anything, just give me a call."

Having this link back to Eruera, even if he can't really get to you to help out, loosens up a tightness in your chest you weren't even aware you had.

(You could ask him about himself , the coastal cutter , the dinosaurs , Olive The Magic Oviraptor , the battery , Aotearoa , or your vision .)

> save
Ok.

> ask eruera about oviraptor
"Hey, Eruera?"

"Yes?"

"I ran into a little dinosaur -- it was only about as high as my knee, but it was pretty active and, well, aggressive."

"That was probably an oviraptor, Tim. There are several species of the little pests around here."

You shift a bit. "Are they dangerous?"

"Well, to small lizards, bugs, and eggs, sure. Not really to people, although they're protective and have a nasty bite."

> ask eruera about vision
"When we were in the ocean -- before I made it to the crate -- I thought I saw my father, back before he died."

Eruera looks at you with interest. "You had a vision?"

"Yes, I was a little kid again, maybe five years old, and my dad was teaching me how to swim."

"Tim, in the Māori culture, such visions are not uncommon. It is often said that the wairua -- the soul -- of an ancestor can send visions of warning or guidance. Perhaps your father's wairua gave you strength as you struggled in the ocean."

> n
As you leave, Eruera calls out to you. " Haere rā and waimaria , Tim. Come back safely."

North Strand
The black sand beach transitions to stones and boulders here as the seashore lifts into the black cliffs. To the northwest a break in the volcanic stone leads upwards and into the depths of the forest. Where the water eddies at the north end of the beach a collection of light, floating junk has collected.

Shreds of what used to be a thick rope are here, washed up on the rocks at the north end of the beach and coated in black sand grains.

> x radio
It's a fairly bulky military-surplus radio. It's apparently pretty rugged, as it must have somehow survived the crash. Its controls are simple and foolproof -- a single button on the side that you can press to call the person holding the other radio.

> press button
You press the transmitter button. "Can I ask you a question, Eruera?"

"Sure, Tim. What would you like to talk about?"

(You could ask him about himself , the coastal cutter , the dinosaurs , the battery , Aotearoa , or your vision .)

> ask eruera about himself
(himself)
"Could you tell me a little about yourself?"

Eruera pauses for a moment, as if surprised by the question. "Sure, Tim... Hmmm, where to start? I grew up in Kākarauri, a small village on the west coast. My family was large -- I had five brothers and sisters. We were poor -- Kākarauri is not prosperous, and my parents were not well educated. I took advantage of a government scholarship program to go to college, and it required me to join the ADF -- the army -- for four years. The poacher problem on the coasts was getting bad at the time, so I spent two of those years on detached duty with the Conservation Service."

"Those first couple years were hardly as exciting as the events of the last few hours, but they were enough to make me see that I wanted to stay in. When my duty to the ADF was discharged, I signed up with the Conservation Service full-time."

You can hear the smile in his voice. "Twelve more years and here we are."

> nw
You release the transmitter as you walk, ending the conversation.

Forest Edge
Low bushy ferns give way to towering kauri trees here. Their delicate cones and thin, green leaves cast deeper shadows as the forest thickens to the northeast. A steep break in the cliff rock here leads southeast, down to the beach, and a faint animal trail leads into the forest to the northeast.

> ne

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

Olive The Magic Oviraptor, who stands no taller than your shin, is nearby. She raises her head to issue a warbling call that sounds remarkably like a bird's, while continuing to watch you out of the corner of her eye.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that Olive The Magic Oviraptor is using as a nest.

> n

Stream South
You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. There doesn't seem to be an obvious way across, unfortunately, although one of the trees by the riverbank has very irregular bark, looks climbable, and has a branch that extends out over the water. A similar, older tree sags over the stream on the far bank.

As you approach the stream, you notice a creature peeping out at you from behind a tree on the far bank. After a few moments you notice that it's holding on to the trunk of the tree, seven feet off the ground. You watch it silently, neither of you making a move for the moment. After thirty seconds or so, it musters up some courage and swings itself around the trunk in an impossible acrobatic move, landing lightly on the ground next to the tree. It seems to be some sort of... monkey, maybe, but with small yellow eyes and huge, scooped ears on a rat-like head. You know you've seen this, or something like it, in your reference book before, but you can't quite remember the name....

You take an involuntary step closer to get a better look at it. It steps forward to get a better look at you. You scratch your head in thought, still trying to remember what species it is. It scratches its head as well. You stop. It stops.

I remember! It's a nanakia ! And that coloration means she's a female!

> save
Ok.

> name nanakia Nancy The Naughty Nanakia
You address the nanakia, who draws herself up with a look of interest. "I'm going to call you 'Nancy The Naughty Nanakia'."

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia's eyes gleam, and she preens with the attention.

> x nanakia
Nancy The Naughty Nanakia looks kind of like a lemur, with spotted brown fur, delicate arms, and a long, thin tail. Her head is the big tipoff that she's not a lemur or a monkey -- two scooped ears that swivel around when she listens, beady yellow eyes, and a ratlike snout make it obvious that this creature has to be related to bats in some way. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia stands on her hind legs on the far bank, watching you intently and mimicking your every move.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently from across the stream. She notices you looking at her and gets very excited. She draws herself up to her full height, wiggles her handlike paws, and twitches her tail.

> e
After stumbling a bit on the steep, rough rocks and nearly falling into the stream, you decide it's too dangerous to continue downstream.

> w
After stumbling a bit on the steep, rough rocks and nearly falling into the stream, you decide it's too dangerous to continue upstream.

Man I'm such a pussy.

> climb tree
(the irregular kauri)
You approach the irregular
kauri tree, heart pounding, trying to motivate yourself to climb. I can do this! I know I can! But every step towards the trunk sends the blood pulsing through you faster, and the fear sizzles inside you, and you just can't force yourself to climb the tree.

I know it's stupid, but what if I fall? What if I get hurt, or die?

> climb tree
(the irregular kauri)
You approach the irregular
kauri tree, heart pounding, trying to motivate yourself to climb. I can do this! I know I can! But every step towards the trunk sends the blood pulsing through you faster, and the fear sizzles inside you, and you just can't force yourself to climb the tree.

I know it's stupid, but what if I fall? What if I get hurt, or die?

> l
Stream South
You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. There doesn't seem to be an obvious way across, unfortunately, although one of the trees by the riverbank has very irregular bark, looks climbable, and has a branch that extends out over the water. A similar, older tree sags over the stream on the far bank.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia stands on her hind legs on the far bank, watching you intently and mimicking your every move.

> i
You are carrying:
a field radio
a leaky bucket, currently empty
a stick

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently from across the stream. She watches you taking stock of your possessions, then starts looking at herself and patting her fur in a pretty good impersonation of you. Her search reveals an unknown insect, which she pops in her mouth and crunches with gusto.

> s

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

Olive The Magic Oviraptor, who stands no taller than your shin, is nearby. She stares at you with intense, beady eyes, tensed to spring away.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that Olive The Magic Oviraptor is using as a nest.

> ne

Top of Falls
Here a mountain stream reaches the headwall and plunges over. The water falls forty feet or so, splattering off a black rock ledge below before reforming and flowing into the ocean. The cliff is too sheer to descend on this side, but you can see that there's a rockfall just past the north bank that you might be able to scramble down -- if you could get to it.

> n
There's no good way across the stream in that direction.

> x stream
The fast-moving stream falls steeply from the mountains to the west and flows generally southeast. Although it's not particularly wide, the fast current and rapids make it far too dangerous to try to wade or swim across.

> x falls
The stream plunges straight over the sheer cliff. Even a quick look confirms that it's far too slick and sheer to attempt to climb down from here.

> sw

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

Olive The Magic Oviraptor, who stands no taller than your shin, is nearby. She slowly moves from tree to tree, searching for something while always managing to keep you in view.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that Olive The Magic Oviraptor is using as a nest.

> n

Stream South
You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. There doesn't seem to be an obvious way across, unfortunately, although one of the trees by the riverbank has very irregular bark, looks climbable, and has a branch that extends out over the water. A similar, older tree sags over the stream on the far bank.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia stands on her hind legs on the far bank, watching you intently and mimicking your every move.

> talk to eruera
You can't see anything by that name here.

> press button
You click the transmitter. "Can I ask you a question, Eruera?"

"Sure, Tim. What would you like to talk about?"

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently from across the river. She makes a few halfhearted motions, trying to imitate calling Eruera on the field radio, but quickly gives up and returns to watching you.

(You could ask him about the captain , the coastal cutter , the dinosaurs , the battery , the stream , Aotearoa , the poachers , your vision , the Conservation Service , or your fear of heights .)

> ask him about stream
"There's a stream up north, a little way past the ridge."

"Yes, you'll likely encounter several such streams on your journey north. Take care, it can sometimes be difficult to cross safely."

> ask him about heights
"I wanted to ask you about... well... climbing."

"Climbing, Tim?"

"Yes. I've wanted to climb some of these trees -- I've even started to try -- but I just... Are they safe to climb?"

"Ah, I think I understand. The bark is smooth, yes? And the branches are high?"

"Yes! I've never climbed a tree like this before. They're so tall! If I slipped and fell, I might break a bone, or even get killed!"

Eruera is silent for a moment. "Well, Tim, I'm not sure what to tell you. I can't tell you it's completely safe, but I will say that Māori children often climb and play in trees much like these, and these are children younger than you, Tim. I feel certain that if you feel you need to climb a kauri , and you concentrate hard on what you are doing, that you will succeed."

Immediately your mind fills with an image of the young boy you saw when you imagined being back learning to swim with Dad, before the accident. But this time the young boy is scampering up a tall tree like a hairless monkey, grabbing handholds quickly and surely as he climbs. After reaching the lower branches, he turns to you and beckons, and somehow your fear lessens. It's still there, but somehow more manageable. Something you can master, rather than the other way around. The young boy smiles and the brief vision ends.

"Tim? Are you listening?"

You shake your head, back to reality. "Yes, Eruera," you say. "You know, I think I might be able to give this a try."

"You do? Very good! Take care and I'm sure you'll be fine."

> climb tree
(the irregular kauri)
You release the transmitter as you walk, ending the conversation.

Streamside Tree
You are perched on a fairly thick branch of a kauri tree about thirty feet above the ground, which is about as high as you can climb, and higher than you feel truly comfortable with anyway. Above this level the bark is too smooth to climb, and you can't imagine trying to climb any higher even if it wasn't. The branch extends north out over the river. You take a moment to savor your victory -- you did it! You actually climbed all the way up to the low branches of a tall kauri tree! Sure, you were scared, but you did it anyway!

I wish that little Māori boy was here so I could thank him .

Across the river, you notice Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watching you climb with great interest. She hops onto what looks like a dead or dying kauri on the north bank, which appears to have some sort of major trunk damage near the ground. The nanakia scampers up the trunk to a branch, about at your level, that reaches south across the stream.

> n
You carefully creep out along the branch as it sags more and more under your weight. Your deathgrip on the branch takes most of your attention, but out of the corner of your eye you see Nancy The Naughty Nanakia approaching you, moving out over the river on her branch. The damaged kauri 's limb sags and creaks alarmingly even under the slight weight of Nancy The Naughty Nanakia. She doesn't seem the slightest bit concerned. You, however, come to the abrupt realization that you're hanging about thirty feet above a rushing stream in the middle of the Aotearoan bush, and decide to retreat to the trunk.

> x tree
(the irregular kauri)
The irregular
kauri on the south side of the stream looks climbable, its rougher, more wavy bark offering you more footholds than most of this type of tree you've seen. And, of course, you've already proved it's climbable -- you're sitting comfortably in it right now.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently from her perch on the branch across the stream. She notices you looking at the irregular kauri and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

> d

Stream South
On the way down from the branch one of the waves in the bark gives way under your feet, causing you to slip for a foot or so before you manage to catch yourself. After a few seconds to calm yourself, you continue down the remaining few feet to the ground, gripping the trunk with white knuckles the whole way.

You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. There doesn't seem to be an obvious way across, unfortunately, although one of the trees by the riverbank has very irregular bark, looks climbable, and has a branch that extends out over the water. A similar, older tree sags over the stream on the far bank.

A small chunk of gnarled bark from the trunk of the kauri tree rests on the ground where it fell during your downward climb.

As you reach the ground, the nanakia gracefully drops out of the tree on her bank, and resumes watching you, an intent expression on her little face.

> x bark
(the chunk of bark)
The bark is about a foot in diameter, thick and round, and there's a fair-sized blob of sticky sap or gum attached to it as well.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently from across the stream. She notices you looking at the chunk of bark and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

> i
You are carrying:
a field radio
a leaky bucket, currently empty
a stick

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently from across the stream. She watches you taking stock of your possessions, then starts looking at herself and patting her fur in a pretty good impersonation of you. Her search reveals a burr, which she pops in her mouth and crunches with gusto.

> x stick
A straight piece of green tree branch, thin and flexible.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently from across the stream. She notices you looking at the stick and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

> get bark
(the chunk of bark)
Taken.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently from across the stream. She notices you reaching for the chunk of bark and picks up a fairly heavy nearby rock, holding it with some difficulty in obvious mimicry.

> s

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

Olive The Magic Oviraptor, who stands no taller than your shin, is nearby. She stares at you with intense, beady eyes, tensed to spring away.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that Olive The Magic Oviraptor is using as a nest.

> sw

Forest Edge
Low bushy ferns give way to towering kauri trees here. Their delicate cones and thin, green leaves cast deeper shadows as the forest thickens to the northeast. A steep break in the cliff rock here leads southeast, down to the beach, and a faint animal trail leads into the forest to the northeast.

> exits
The obvious exits are northeast and southeast.

(Use EXITS ON to enable the status line exit lister and EXITS OFF to turn it off. You may also cycle through the available colors to use for unvisited rooms with the command EXIT COLOR.)

> exist on
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> exits on
Exit listing is now on.

> se

North Strand
The black sand beach transitions to stones and boulders here as the seashore lifts into the black cliffs. To the northwest a break in the volcanic stone leads upwards and into the depths of the forest. Where the water eddies at the north end of the beach a collection of light, floating junk has collected.

Shreds of what used to be a thick rope are here, washed up on the rocks at the north end of the beach and coated in black sand grains.

> exit color
Done.

> exit color
Done.

> l
North Strand
The black sand beach transitions to stones and boulders here as the seashore lifts into the black cliffs. To the northwest a break in the volcanic stone leads upwards and into the depths of the forest. Where the water eddies at the north end of the beach a collection of light, floating junk has collected.

Shreds of what used to be a thick rope are here, washed up on the rocks at the north end of the beach and coated in black sand grains.

> exit color
Done.

> l
North Strand
The black sand beach transitions to stones and boulders here as the seashore lifts into the black cliffs. To the northwest a break in the volcanic stone leads upwards and into the depths of the forest. Where the water eddies at the north end of the beach a collection of light, floating junk has collected.

Shreds of what used to be a thick rope are here, washed up on the rocks at the north end of the beach and coated in black sand grains.

> x rope
Shreds of what used to be a thick rope are here, washed up on the rocks at the north end of the beach and coated in black sand grains.

> get it
The remains of the rope are soggy and useless, and you end up just giving up and dropping the slimy shreds back onto the beach.

> n
Steep black rocks block your path in that direction. It doesn't look like you'd be able to climb them.

> nw

Forest Edge
Low bushy ferns give way to towering kauri trees here. Their delicate cones and thin, green leaves cast deeper shadows as the forest thickens to the northeast. A steep break in the cliff rock here leads southeast, down to the beach, and a faint animal trail leads into the forest to the northeast.

> ne

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

Olive The Magic Oviraptor, who stands no taller than your shin, is nearby. She raises her head to issue a warbling call that sounds remarkably like a bird's, while continuing to watch you out of the corner of her eye.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that Olive The Magic Oviraptor is using as a nest.

> exits
The obvious exits are north, northeast and southwest.

> ne

Top of Falls
Here a mountain stream reaches the headwall and plunges over. The water falls forty feet or so, splattering off a black rock ledge below before reforming and flowing into the ocean. The cliff is too sheer to descend on this side, but you can see that there's a rockfall just past the north bank that you might be able to scramble down -- if you could get to it.

> exits
The only obvious exit is southwest.

> sw

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

Olive The Magic Oviraptor, who stands no taller than your shin, is nearby. She slowly moves from tree to tree, searching for something while always managing to keep you in view.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that Olive The Magic Oviraptor is using as a nest.

> n

Stream South
You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. There doesn't seem to be an obvious way across, unfortunately, although one of the trees by the riverbank has very irregular bark, looks climbable, and has a branch that extends out over the water. A similar, older tree sags over the stream on the far bank.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia stands on her hind legs on the far bank, watching you intently and mimicking your every move. She seems to be carrying a fairly large rock.

> i
You are carrying:
a chunk of bark
a field radio
a leaky bucket, currently empty
a stick

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently from across the stream. She watches you taking stock of your possessions, then starts looking at herself and patting her fur in a pretty good impersonation of you. Her search reveals a flea, which she pops in her mouth and crunches with gusto.

> talk to eruera
You can't see anything by that name here.

> press button
You press the transmitter button. "Can I ask you a question, Eruera?"

"Sure, Tim. What would you like to talk about?"

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently from across the river. She makes a few halfhearted motions, trying to imitate calling Eruera on the field radio, but quickly gives up and returns to watching you.

(You could ask him about the captain , the coastal cutter , the dinosaurs , the battery , Aotearoa , the poachers , your vision , or the Conservation Service .)

> ask eruera about dinosaurs
"What can you tell me about the dinosaurs that live here?"

Eruera thinks for a moment, then answers slowly. "We really shouldn't waste time with this until we've secured rescue, but I know that's the main reason you came, and you haven't gotten your chance to see them yet, so I'll indulge your curiosity. In many ways, Tim, the taniwha are the living symbols of this whole nation. When the Māori first arrived in Aotearoa, they fought the taniwha simply to exist here. In those days, they covered the continent, for the most part, and weren't really willing to share it with humans."

"But eventually the Māori learned how to coexist with the taniwha , and even partially domesticate some of them. When the pākehā came, bringing guns and colonists and looking for land to clear and farm, the Māori met their firearms with kairākau mounted on taniwha . Their mana was strong -- the British guns had some effect, but the bony plates on the taniwha's heads served as shields and made the riders difficult targets. The pākehā were unable to simply take Māori land, but they weren't willing to give up. Years of fighting ensued, until Pitiroi -- Robert FitzRoy -- was sent here from Great Britain and met with the great chiefs -- the rangatira -- and signed the Treaty of Waitangi."

"The Treaty established a permanent state of alliance between Great Britain and Aotearoa. Māori sovereignty was guaranteed, but the pākehā were granted rights and brought into the iwi , or family, of Aotearoa. Many speculate that if the taniwha had not existed, we might have ended up like the aboriginal people of the Australian or American colonies -- a broken people, stripped of their land and heritage."

"So the taniwha are vitally important to the Māori people, Tim. That is why we work so hard to protect them."

> climb tree
(the irregular kauri)
You release the transmitter as you walk, ending the conversation.

Streamside Tree
You are perched on a fairly thick branch of a kauri tree about thirty feet above the ground, which is about as high as you can climb, and higher than you feel truly comfortable with anyway. Above this level the bark is too smooth to climb, and you can't imagine trying to climb any higher even if it wasn't. The branch extends north out over the river.

Across the river, you notice Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watching you climb with great interest. She hops onto what looks like a dead or dying kauri on the north bank, juggling her rock to try to keep hold of it. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia's tree appears to have some sort of major trunk damage near the ground, but she ignores it and climbs up the trunk to a branch about at your level that reaches south across the stream.

OK. I solved this by accident.

> n
You carefully creep out along the branch as it sags more and more under your weight. Your deathgrip on the branch takes most of your attention, but out of the corner of your eye, you see Nancy The Naughty Nanakia approaching you, moving out over the river on her branch, cradling her rock with one arm. The damaged kauri sags and creaks dangerously under the weight of Nancy The Naughty Nanakia and her rock, but she seems oblivious to the danger.

Suddenly, her branch gives way! No, wait! It's the tree itself! The rotted section near the ground splinters under the leverage of both Nancy The Naughty Nanakia and her rock. Quickly, she dumps the rock and leaps back toward the trunk, but the tree is already falling! She sprints down the trunk towards the ground, and manages to jump off right before impact. She tumbles into a pile of debris and vanishes for a moment before popping out, shaking leaves and dirt off herself, and looking up at you with a gleam in her eye. You retreat backwards, closer to the trunk.

> d

Stream South
You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. An old, dead kauri tree has fallen across the stream here, its straight trunk making a narrow bridge to the north side.

As you reach the ground, the nanakia pops her head up from of a tangle of underbrush and peeps out at you, beady eyes sparkling.

> save
Ok.

> n
You step out onto the fallen tree, balancing carefully with arms outstretched, walking slowly across the flowing water. The nanakia scampers onto the trunk as well, then raises herself to stand on her hind feet, splays her front paws out to the sides, and waddles forward in a surprisingly good impersonation of you. As you near each other, the nanakia drops back to all fours...

And then springs at you, scampering up your chest to your shoulder, where she perches as if she belongs there.

You immediately twist away in panic, but you can't go too crazy, because you're more afraid of falling off the log and into the river. In a moment, you realize Nancy The Naughty Nanakia isn't hurting you, and you try to relax and slow your heartbeat down again. Well, I guess I've made a new friend!

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> l
Stream South
You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. An old, dead kauri tree has fallen across the stream here, its straight trunk making a narrow bridge to the north side.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, scratching happily and waiting for you to do something more interesting.

> n

Stream North
This is the north bank of the cascading stream. Water tumbles over rocks as it rushes through the forest down towards the shore. To the east, a shallow slope of rocks and debris leads down further into the forest, away from the western mountains. A relatively straight, dead kauri tree has fallen across the stream here, bridging the banks and allowing you to cross to the south.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia ambles along in your wake, curious to see what you're going to do next.

After touching your feet on the north side of the stream, you can't help pulling out the field radio and placing a call. "Eruera! I made it across the stream! Nancy The Naughty Nanakia -- sorry, that's a nanakia that I found -- was copying everything I did, so I got it to pick up a rock and climb up a dying tree on the far bank. The weight was just enough to make it tip over and fall across the stream!"

Eruera chuckles. "Very good, Tim! I'm not sure I followed all that, but I'm pleased you're making progress!"

"Me too! I actually climbed a tree on my side of the stream -- that was how I got Nancy The Naughty Nanakia to climb too!"

> e

Debris Slope
To the west, a very shallow slope of mixed scree and debris leads up to the bank of the mountain stream. At the bottom, where you stand, the forest thickens again, with faint animal trails leading north into the deeper forest and east towards the thinner trees that line the coast. By keeping close to the streambank, you could also manage to follow the water southeast down toward the shore.

A large boulder stands out from the rest of the mixed rock and debris. It's remarkable for being particularly round.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia saunters along off to your side, curious to see what you're up to.

> x boulder
A surprisingly round boulder, resting on the forest floor.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, showing her interest by her perked ears and unblinking stare. She notices you looking at the boulder and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

> se
You walk parallel to the stream, then scramble down a rockfall that cuts through the cliff edge. You climb down as far as you can go, stopping at a deep ledge of dark rock that is slick with spray from the stream falling over the headwall above.

Falls Bottom
The falling stream splashes off a ledge of black volcanic rock here, filling the air with a haze of cool, fine droplets that weave the sunlight into a glory -- a circular rainbow -- about your head. There's only a small pool at the base of the falls -- the overflowing water spills over the lip and flows the short distance into the ocean.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia ambles along behind you, curious to see what you're going to do next.

> e
That would require jumping off the ledge, which is terrifying to consider and would probably prove fatal.

> exits
The obvious exits are northwest and up.

> u

Debris Slope
To the west, a very shallow slope of mixed scree and debris leads up to the bank of the mountain stream. At the bottom, where you stand, the forest thickens again, with faint animal trails leading north into the deeper forest and east towards the thinner trees that line the coast. By keeping close to the streambank, you could also manage to follow the water southeast down toward the shore.

A large boulder stands out from the rest of the mixed rock and debris. It's remarkable for being particularly round.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia scampers in your wake, curious to see what you're up to.

> e

Tree Screen
The forest thins rapidly here as you approach the coast. It looks as though you could probably travel in the clear, walking parallel to the coast, and you'd go quite a bit faster if you did. A very narrow animal trail leads west.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia ambles along behind you, curious to see what you're going to do next.

> s
The undergrowth is really thick in that direction. It's probably best to stick to the animal trails, faint as they are, to avoid getting lost or getting hurt walking over ground you can't really see.

> w

Debris Slope
To the west, a very shallow slope of mixed scree and debris leads up to the bank of the mountain stream. At the bottom, where you stand, the forest thickens again, with faint animal trails leading north into the deeper forest and east towards the thinner trees that line the coast. By keeping close to the streambank, you could also manage to follow the water southeast down toward the shore.

A large boulder stands out from the rest of the mixed rock and debris. It's remarkable for being particularly round.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia saunters along in your wake, curious to see what adventures you have planned next.

> n

Moa Nest
The trail descends into a hollow here, free of trees. Centered in the valley floor is a large mound of volcanic rock, venting what looks like smoke or steam from a fumarole on top. The surrounding rock is riddled with cracks, crevices, and fissures, and hidden in one of the larger depressions is a very large bird's nest, which doesn't look completely intact. The forest trail leads upslope to both the north and south.

If there have been dinosaurs here all the time, would moas ever have had a chance to evolve?

I suppose you get ostriches and emus in competition with mammals, so why not?

A huge flightless bird steps back and forth around her nest in agitation. She looks like she's at least twice your height -- maybe three times! She can't be anything but a nesting moa.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia dawdles along off to your side, curious to see what you're going to do next.

After looking around, you decide this location is worth asking Eruera about, so you pull out the field radio and place a call. "Eruera, I've stumbled across a pretty strange area."

"Could you describe it, Tim?"

"Well, there's kind of a mini-volcano in the middle of a clearing here..."

Eruera interrupts you, sounding amused. "Well, it probably is! There is a great deal of volcanic activity all over Aotearoa, and it certainly wouldn't be unusual to run across hot springs or a fumarole."

"Oh! I didn't know they were that common. Are they safe?"

"Reasonably. Don't go jumping into one, but most of the time these aren't particularly active. They might lead to hot rock, somewhere below, but around here there's not much risk of a full-scale eruption."

"OK, thanks." You eye the moa as it paces back and forth, then click the transmitter again. "Um, Eruera? I had one more question. Can a moa be dangerous?"

"Ah! There's a moa there? Well, I'm sure if you ran right up to it you'd probably get attacked, but they're usually pretty cautious of people. As long as you keep a reasonable distance from it, you should be fine."

You continue watching the moa, which still seems to be staying near its nest. "OK, thanks again!"

"No problem, Tim. Good luck!"

The moa paces, fretful and silent.

> name moa Millicent The Majestic Moa
You address the moa. "I'm going to call you 'Millicent The Majestic Moa'."

Millicent The Majestic Moa seems utterly disinterested.

Millicent The Majestic Moa hops back and forth, obviously agitated.

> x moa
The moa has reddish-brown feathers with white tips, and her small head sits on top of a long neck that's probably as tall as you are. Her eyes, tiny, expressionless black beads, flick around the area but always seem to return to the large crevice in the mound of rock.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, curiosity evident from her tilted head and unconscious chittering. She notices you looking at Millicent The Majestic Moa and peers at her with exaggerated interest.

Millicent The Majestic Moa makes a plaintive crooning sound while bobbing her head at the crevice.

> look in crevice
In the crevice is an egg.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, her interest indicated by her twitching tail and unblinking stare. She notices you looking at the crevice and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

Millicent The Majestic Moa paces, fretful and silent.

> get egg
You can't quite reach the moa egg with your hand, even wedging yourself into the crevice up to your shoulder.

Millicent The Majestic Moa hops back and forth, obviously agitated.

> i
You are carrying:
a chunk of bark
a field radio
a leaky bucket, currently empty
a stick

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, showing her interest by her tilted head and fixed gaze. She watches you taking stock of your possessions, then starts looking at herself and patting her fur in a pretty good impersonation of you. Her search reveals an unknown insect, which she pops in her mouth and crunches with gusto.

Millicent The Majestic Moa paces, fretful and silent.

> put bark on stick
The stick won't support that.

Millicent The Majestic Moa makes a plaintive crooning sound while bobbing her head at the crevice.

> stick bark to stick
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> attach bark to stick
That won't accomplish anything.

Millicent The Majestic Moa paces, fretful and silent.

> get egg with stick
You reach the stick carefully into the crevice and prod at the egg, but the opening is just too narrow to get much leverage and you can't quite lever it out.

Millicent The Majestic Moa hops back and forth, obviously agitated.

> put gum on stick
(first taking the blob of sticky gum)

You peel the gum from the bark, getting some on your hands in the process. It's very sticky.

You affix the blob of gum onto the end of the stick, doing your best to wipe your hands clean on your pants afterwards.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, her interest indicated by her twitching tail and unconscious chittering. She watches with great interest, trying to see where the blob of sticky gum is going.

Millicent The Majestic Moa makes a plaintive crooning sound while bobbing her head at the crevice.

> get egg with stick
You carefully insert the gummed stick and press it against the eggshell, then draw it back. It works! You can feel the egg sliding up the crevice, and although it breaks free of the gum's grip near the top of the crevice, you manage to snag it before it rolls back, and set it down safely next to the crevice opening. The moa darts forward as she sees the egg, snatching it away with a triumphant squawk! She carries the egg back to the nest and places it there gently, flipping the GPS aside into the surrounding grass without a second glance.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently. She makes a few halfhearted motions, trying to imitate retrieving the egg with the stick, but quickly gives up and returns to watching you.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia looks at you curiously. She seems to be impressed.

> save
Ok.

> score
You have so far scored 6 out of a possible 12, in 228 turns.

> get gps
Taken.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, showing her interest by her tilted head and fixed gaze. She notices you reaching for the GPS, but apparently she's decided she's had enough of carrying things around for now, as she just watches you calmly.

> x it
The GPS is bright yellow and labeled with the brand name "Amring". It's a very simple model, with just a single button to display coordinates. You push the button and nothing happens. Apparently the GPS is out of power.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, her interest indicated by her twitching tail and unblinking stare. She notices you looking at the GPS and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

> n

Forest Clearing
The narrow forest trail opens onto a small clearing here, where the kauri gives way to unhealthy-looking ferns and thin, yellowish grass. The trail leaves the clearing to both north and south.

A folded sheet of what looks like notebook paper lies wedged up against a tree root at the edge of the clearing.

A small dinosaur similar to the one you saw before stands here. He splits his time between glaring at Nancy The Naughty Nanakia and tracking every move you make with the shiny GPS unit.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia scampers behind you, curious to see what adventures you have planned next.

Abruptly, the male oviraptor charges Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, spitting and hissing, before quickly retreating back to a nearby patch of undergrowth. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes a noise that sounds suspiciously like a laugh.

> get paper
You retrieve the paper, unfold it, and discover that it's a map!

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, showing her interest by her tilted head and unconscious chittering. She notices you reaching for the map, but apparently she's decided she's had enough of carrying things around for now, as she just watches you calmly.

Suddenly, the male oviraptor screeches at Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, rearing and skittering back towards the safety of a tree. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia leaps to your shoulder and chatters for a moment.

> x map
A rough sketch shows the surrounding area of coastline, from the brook in the south to something marked as "camp" along the coast to the north. They've also marked a path northwest from "camp" to a location marked with an "X" and the label "dinos". The map has little tree shapes surrounding the "X".

At the bottom of the map are two sets of GPS coordinates, written in terrible handwriting:

Camp: 46° 11' 97" S, 179° 12' 81" W
Dinos: 46° 10' 58" S, 179° 12' 33" W.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, her interest indicated by her twitching tail and unblinking stare. She notices you looking at the map and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

Abruptly, the male oviraptor charges Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, spitting and hissing, before quickly retreating back to a nearby patch of undergrowth. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia seems unfazed.

> name male oviraptor Osbert The Odd Oviraptor
You address the male oviraptor. "I'm going to call you 'Osbert The Odd Oviraptor'."

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor seems utterly disinterested.

With a sudden lunge, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor hisses threateningly at Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, stomping back and forth in an exaggerated threat display that's as earnest as it is ridiculous. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes a noise that sounds suspiciously like a laugh.

> n
The forest gets really thick up ahead, and the animal trail vanishes into the undergrowth. Without some way of figuring out where you are and where you're going, you stand a good chance of getting lost, and you're not desperate enough to be willing to risk that. You have the map, but no way to fix your position.

Suddenly, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor screeches at Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, rearing and skittering back towards the safety of a tree. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia leaps to your shoulder and chatters for a moment.

> x ferns
Ferns with fluffy leaves are found among the grasses on the ground, softening the sounds you hear.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, showing her interest by her perked ears and unconscious chittering. She notices you looking at the ferns and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

With a sudden lunge, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor charges Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, spitting and hissing, before quickly retreating back to a nearby patch of undergrowth. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes a noise that sounds suspiciously like a laugh.

> x grass
Ferns with fluffy leaves are found among the grasses on the ground, softening the sounds you hear.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, her interest indicated by her tilted head and fixed gaze. She notices you looking at the ferns and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

Suddenly, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor screeches at Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, rearing and skittering back towards the safety of a tree. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia leaps to your shoulder and chatters for a moment.

> s

Moa Nest
The trail descends into a hollow here, free of trees. Centered in the valley floor is a large mound of volcanic rock, venting what looks like smoke or steam from a fumarole on top. The surrounding rock is riddled with cracks, crevices, and fissures, and hidden in one of the larger depressions is a very large bird's nest, which doesn't look completely intact. The forest trail leads upslope to both the north and south.

Millicent The Majestic Moa sits on her nest, calm and satisfied.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia dawdles along off to your side, curious to see what you're going to do next.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor, moving with exaggerated caution, shadows you with his eyes fixed on the GPS unit. He seems only partially aware of what he's doing.

With a sudden lunge, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor hisses threateningly at Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, stomping back and forth in an exaggerated threat display that's as earnest as it is ridiculous. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia seems unfazed.

> s

Debris Slope
To the west, a very shallow slope of mixed scree and debris leads up to the bank of the mountain stream. At the bottom, where you stand, the forest thickens again, with faint animal trails leading north into the deeper forest and east towards the thinner trees that line the coast. By keeping close to the streambank, you could also manage to follow the water southeast down toward the shore.

A large boulder stands out from the rest of the mixed rock and debris. It's remarkable for being particularly round.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia scampers behind you, curious to see what adventures you have planned next.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor, making his best attempt at stealth, follows you with his eyes fixed on the GPS unit. He seems only partially aware of what he's doing.

Suddenly, Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes a lunge toward the GPS, and succeeds in knocking it out of your hands!

Dropping the GPS unit starts a chain reaction of events: Osbert The Odd Oviraptor lunges forward to seize the shiny yellow device, as does Nancy The Naughty Nanakia. Osbert The Odd Oviraptor's quick lunge meets with initial success, but Nancy The Naughty Nanakia snatches it away. They start fighting with each other, neither one gaining an advantage.

Suddenly, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor charges Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, spitting and hissing, before quickly retreating back to a nearby patch of undergrowth. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes a noise that sounds suspiciously like a laugh.

> get gps
Taken.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, showing her interest by her perked ears and unblinking stare. She notices you reaching for the GPS, but apparently she's decided she's had enough of carrying things around for now, as she just watches you calmly.

With a sudden lunge, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor screeches at Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, rearing and skittering back towards the safety of a tree. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia seems unfazed.

> e

Tree Screen
The forest thins rapidly here as you approach the coast. It looks as though you could probably travel in the clear, walking parallel to the coast, and you'd go quite a bit faster if you did. A very narrow animal trail leads west.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia dawdles along off to your side, curious to see what you're going to do next.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor, moving with exaggerated caution, trails you with his eyes fixed on the GPS unit. He seems only partially aware of what he's doing.

Abruptly, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor charges Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, spitting and hissing, before quickly retreating back to a nearby patch of undergrowth. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes a noise that sounds suspiciously like a laugh.

> n
You head off across the field toward the coast, happy to no longer have to push through the buggy undergrowth of the forest. You get maybe fifty yards away from the treeline when you hear human voices and the rumbling sounds of a truck engine to the northeast. The voices seem to be arguing.

There's no way this could be the station -- there's no tower! But if it isn't a Conservation Service station...

You freeze, very conscious of how exposed you are, and desperately hope no one pokes their head over the slight ridge between you and their camp, which must be just out of sight to the northeast. All of a sudden the field radio squawks to life. "Tim? How's it going?"

Horrified, you drop to the ground and fumble for the radio, then hiss back. "Quiet for now -- someone's close!" You listen very carefully. The argument seems to have stopped, but you can't tell if that's because they heard you or if they resolved things themselves. Slowly, you creep back to the safety of the trees, and when you are confident you're screened from view you call Eruera back.

"OK, we can talk now."

Eruera responds quickly. "Tim, what was that?"

"I'm positive the poacher camp is just over a hill, not very far to the northeast. I could hear engines and loud voices."

Eruera's voice sounds very strained. "I beg you, take great care, Tim. I'm sorry it has to be you making this journey, but you must stay away from these men. Stick to the bush and keep heading north."

"OK, Eruera. Not a problem. I don't want to be caught by these guys either."

"Good luck, Tim. Stay safe." You stand still for a moment, breathing hard, trying to calm back down. But no one is coming, so you seem to be safe for now.

With a sudden lunge, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor screeches at Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, rearing and skittering back towards the safety of a tree. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia seems unfazed.

> w

Debris Slope
To the west, a very shallow slope of mixed scree and debris leads up to the bank of the mountain stream. At the bottom, where you stand, the forest thickens again, with faint animal trails leading north into the deeper forest and east towards the thinner trees that line the coast. By keeping close to the streambank, you could also manage to follow the water southeast down toward the shore.

A large boulder stands out from the rest of the mixed rock and debris. It's remarkable for being particularly round.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia ambles along behind you, curious to see what adventures you have planned next.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor, making his best attempt at stealth, shadows you with his eyes fixed on the GPS unit. He seems only partially aware of what he's doing.

Abruptly, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor charges Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, spitting and hissing, before quickly retreating back to a nearby patch of undergrowth. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes a noise that sounds suspiciously like a laugh.

> w

Stream North
This is the north bank of the cascading stream. Water tumbles over rocks as it rushes through the forest down towards the shore. To the east, a shallow slope of rocks and debris leads down further into the forest, away from the western mountains. A relatively straight, dead kauri tree has fallen across the stream here, bridging the banks and allowing you to cross to the south.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia dawdles along off to your side, curious to see what you're going to do next.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor, moving with exaggerated caution, follows you with his eyes fixed on the GPS unit. He seems only partially aware of what he's doing.

Suddenly, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor screeches at Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, rearing and skittering back towards the safety of a tree. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia leaps to your shoulder and chatters for a moment.

> s

Stream South
You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. An old, dead kauri tree has fallen across the stream here, its straight trunk making a narrow bridge to the north side.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia scampers behind you, curious to see what adventures you have planned next.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor, taking care to keep his distance, trails you with his eyes fixed on the GPS unit. He seems only partially aware of what he's doing.

With a sudden lunge, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor hisses threateningly at Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, stomping back and forth in an exaggerated threat display that's as earnest as it is ridiculous. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia seems unfazed.

> s

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

Olive The Magic Oviraptor, who stands no taller than your shin, is nearby. She raises her head to issue a warbling call that sounds remarkably like a bird's, while continuing to watch you out of the corner of her eye.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that Olive The Magic Oviraptor is using as a nest.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia dawdles along in your wake, curious to see what you're up to.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor stalks along behind you as he's done for some time, fixated on the GPS unit. But something -- possibly a scent or sound -- alerts him to his surroundings. He looks around the area near the trail with jerky head movements, until he spies Olive The Magic Oviraptor. The GPS is forgotten as Osbert The Odd Oviraptor veers abruptly and sprints to Olive The Magic Oviraptor's side. Something very like a battle ensues, quick jabs of the dinos' heads as they peck at each other almost faster than you can track. Olive The Magic Oviraptor seems to win the fight, pinning Osbert The Odd Oviraptor down and chirruping at him before releasing him to stand again. From there they move into some sort of complicated mating dance. From the intensity of their concentration, it seems almost everything else in the world takes second place to the performance.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor and Olive The Magic Oviraptor continue their flirtation, although the presence of a bored and mischievous Nancy The Naughty Nanakia keeps their mating dance from taking their full attention.

> get battery
You approach the nest, but although Osbert The Odd Oviraptor and Olive The Magic Oviraptor seem fixated with each other, the presence of Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, bored and inquisitive, keeps them alert and edgy. Both oviraptors hiss and peck at you as you approach their nest, and you retreat, frustrated.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor and Olive The Magic Oviraptor continue their flirtation, although the presence of a bored and mischievous Nancy The Naughty Nanakia keeps their mating dance from taking their full attention.

> save
Ok.

> get nancy
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> get nanakia
Nancy The Naughty Nanakia doesn't want to be carried.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor and Olive The Magic Oviraptor continue their flirtation, although the presence of a bored and mischievous Nancy The Naughty Nanakia keeps their mating dance from taking their full attention.

> n

Stream South
You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. An old, dead kauri tree has fallen across the stream here, its straight trunk making a narrow bridge to the north side.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia saunters along behind you, curious to see what you're going to do next.

> z
You wait for a bit...

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, her interest indicated by her tilted head and unconscious chittering. She bores quickly, scampering around randomly in the surrounding area like a puppy after two cups of black coffee.

> z
You wait for a bit...

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, curiosity evident from her twitching tail and unblinking stare. She bores quickly, scampering around randomly in the surrounding area like a puppy after two cups of black coffee.

> s

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

The two dinosaurs are engaged in an intricate and extensive mating dance. Osbert The Odd Oviraptor is strutting in spirals around Olive The Magic Oviraptor, demonstrating his fitness and virility. Unfortunately, Osbert The Odd Oviraptor keeps turning to glare at the nearby Nancy The Naughty Nanakia (who seems to be fascinated with this behavior) and in consequence Olive The Magic Oviraptor appears less than impressed by the performance.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that Olive The Magic Oviraptor is using as a nest.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia ambles along off to your side, curious to see what you're up to.

Suddenly, Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes a lunge toward the GPS, but you snatch it away before she can get it away from you.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor and Olive The Magic Oviraptor continue their flirtation, although the presence of a bored and mischievous Nancy The Naughty Nanakia keeps their mating dance from taking their full attention.

> get battery
You approach the nest again, but although Osbert The Odd Oviraptor and Olive The Magic Oviraptor are still making eyes at each other, the presence of the unoccupied Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is still keeping them at least partially focused on what's going on around them, and they spot you as you approach. Both oviraptors again lunge at you as you near the nest, and you retreat once again, empty-handed.

Osbert The Odd Oviraptor and Olive The Magic Oviraptor continue their flirtation, although the presence of a bored and mischievous Nancy The Naughty Nanakia keeps their mating dance from taking their full attention.

> n

Stream South
You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. An old, dead kauri tree has fallen across the stream here, its straight trunk making a narrow bridge to the north side.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia saunters along in your wake, curious to see what you're going to do next.

> i
You are carrying:
an a GPS (unpowered)
a map
a chunk of bark
a field radio
a leaky bucket, currently empty
a stick
a blob of sticky gum

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, her interest indicated by her tilted head and fixed gaze. She watches you taking stock of your possessions, then starts looking at herself and patting her fur in a pretty good impersonation of you. Her search reveals a flea, which she pops in her mouth and crunches with gusto.

> kick nanakia
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> hit nanakia
Violence has its place, but not here.

> give bark to nanakia
(the chunk of bark to Nancy The Naughty Nanakia)
You hold the chunk of bark out to Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, letting it fall to see whether it is interested in it.

Dropped.

Suddenly, Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes a lunge toward the GPS, but you snatch it away before she can get it away from you.

> give gps to nanakia
You hold the GPS out to Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, letting it fall to see whether it is interested in it.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia darts forward to grab the GPS as you drop it. Luckily, she doesn't run off with it; she just settles down to play with it right where it fell.

> s
Nancy The Naughty Nanakia stays put as you leave, engrossed in playing with the GPS.

Animal Trail
The ground cover has been pushed aside by passing animals just enough to make this weaving trail the path of least resistance. There is a very tall kauri tree here, its thick roots snaking in and out of the ground. You can hear swiftly running water from somewhere off to the north. To the southwest you can see the forest lighten as it thins out, and the trail forks here, continuing to both the northeast and the north.

The two dinosaurs are engaged in an intricate and extensive mating dance. Osbert The Odd Oviraptor is fully engaged in demonstrating his many personal virtues to Olive The Magic Oviraptor, prancing with quick jerks of his neck and precise, circling footwork. Olive The Magic Oviraptor seems fascinated with the performance, and both appear unaware of their surroundings.

A shiny battery, apparently discarded or lost by someone, lies half-hidden by a pile of leaves that Olive The Magic Oviraptor is using as a nest.

> get battery
Taken.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> score
You have so far scored 7 out of a possible 12, in 260 turns.

> n

Stream South
You stand at the south bank of a stream rushing down from the western mountains. The water flows over a tumble of rocks and its level drops steeply here, cutting into the ground and leaving steep, raw slopes on either side. An old, dead kauri tree has fallen across the stream here, its straight trunk making a narrow bridge to the north side.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia busily plays with the shiny but inert GPS, continually turning it over and trying to manipulate it.

You can also see a chunk of bark here.

> get bark
(the chunk of bark)
Taken.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, showing her interest by her twitching tail and unconscious chittering. She notices you reaching for the chunk of bark, but apparently she's decided she's had enough of carrying things around for now, as she just watches you calmly.

> get gps
Taken.

> put battery in gps
You pop the battery cover open and slip the battery inside, then close the cover and press the button. Your current latitude and longitude display: 46° 12' 18" S, 179° 12' 66" W.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, curiosity evident from her tilted head and fixed gaze. She watches with great interest, trying to see where the battery is going.

> save
Ok.

> x map
A rough sketch shows the surrounding area of coastline, from the brook in the south to something marked as "camp" along the coast to the north. They've also marked a path northwest from "camp" to a location marked with an "X" and the label "dinos". The map has little tree shapes surrounding the "X".

At the bottom of the map are two sets of GPS coordinates, written in terrible handwriting:

Camp: 46° 11' 97" S, 179° 12' 81" W
Dinos: 46° 10' 58" S, 179° 12' 33" W.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, showing her interest by her twitching tail and unblinking stare. She notices you looking at the map and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

> n

Stream North
This is the north bank of the cascading stream. Water tumbles over rocks as it rushes through the forest down towards the shore. To the east, a shallow slope of rocks and debris leads down further into the forest, away from the western mountains. A relatively straight, dead kauri tree has fallen across the stream here, bridging the banks and allowing you to cross to the south.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia ambles along behind you, curious to see what adventures you have planned next.

> e

Debris Slope
To the west, a very shallow slope of mixed scree and debris leads up to the bank of the mountain stream. At the bottom, where you stand, the forest thickens again, with faint animal trails leading north into the deeper forest and east towards the thinner trees that line the coast. By keeping close to the streambank, you could also manage to follow the water southeast down toward the shore.

A large boulder stands out from the rest of the mixed rock and debris. It's remarkable for being particularly round.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia saunters along in your wake, curious to see what you're up to.

> n

Moa Nest
The trail descends into a hollow here, free of trees. Centered in the valley floor is a large mound of volcanic rock, venting what looks like smoke or steam from a fumarole on top. The surrounding rock is riddled with cracks, crevices, and fissures, and hidden in one of the larger depressions is a very large bird's nest, which doesn't look completely intact. The forest trail leads upslope to both the north and south.

Millicent The Majestic Moa sits on her nest, calm and satisfied.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia dawdles along behind you, curious to see what adventures you have planned next.

Suddenly, Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes a lunge toward the GPS, but you snatch it away before she can get it away from you.

> n

Forest Clearing
The narrow forest trail opens onto a small clearing here, where the kauri gives way to unhealthy-looking ferns and thin, yellowish grass. The trail leaves the clearing to both north and south.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia saunters along off to your side, curious to see what you're going to do next.

> n
Armed with your map and the powered GPS, you strike out into the deeper forest and head north, hoping the station is where Eruera thinks it is. Unfortunately, after just a few short minutes of travel, you hit a wall. Literally. Extending as far as you can see to the east and west is what must be about a twenty-foot volcanic ridge, the remnant of some long-ago eruption. You spend an hour or so scouting it out, trying to find a climbable spot, and eventually you find a place where the stone has crumbled and left a steep defile that you could probably scramble up.

The problem is that there's an obstacle in the way -- a large, bony-headed dinosaur that is rubbing itself energetically against the broken rocks, trying to contort itself to reach a particular spot on its back.

Please press SPACE to continue.

Deep Forest
The breeze blowing the tops of the thickly-clustered kauri makes the few flashes of light dance and whirl around you. The trail is all but lost here. A tall, sheer, charcoal-gray ridge stretches as far as you can see from the east to the west.

Standing alone in the shadow of the stone ridge is a huge animal. Its giant, bony head and squat, powerful body mark it immediately as a notoceratops māori -- the largest species of dinosaur in Aotearoa, and therefore the biggest dinosaur in the world! It's hanging around near a steep defile in the rock wall, rubbing against it like it's desperate. It notes your presence without reaction, obviously completely unthreatened by your presence.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia ambles along in your wake, curious to see what you're up to.

The notoceratops flops on the ground and writhes around in obvious frustration.

> x notoceratops
The notoceratops is an impressive animal, standing seven feet high at the shoulder and probably measuring twenty feet from nose to tail. Its large, bony head lacks the flattened, shield-like flange that the more commonly-known triceratops sports, but the bulbous knob the notoceratops has instead looks just as impressive. The dinosaur's skin is mostly a dull gray, similar to a hippopotamus, but it has dark brown spots on its torso as well. It is currently standing near the defile, attempting to scratch itself against the rough rocks, but apparently failing to reach the right spot.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, curiosity evident from her tilted head and fixed gaze. She notices you looking at the notoceratops and peers at it with exaggerated interest.

The notoceratops rubs against a nearby rock outcrop frustratedly.

> name notoceratops Neil The Nasty Notoceratops
You address the notoceratops. "I'm going to call you 'Neil The Nasty Notoceratops'."

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops seems utterly disinterested.

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops snorts in obvious frustration.

> scratch notoceratops
(with your fingers)
Even if you could push past your fear of the huge, powerful dinosaur to try to scratch it, you don't have the reach required to get at Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's itchy spot.

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops rubs against a nearby rock outcrop in distress.

> i
You are carrying:
an a GPS (powered)
a chunk of bark
a map
a field radio
a leaky bucket, currently empty
a stick
a blob of sticky gum

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, showing her interest by her twitching tail and unconscious chittering. She watches you taking stock of your possessions, then starts looking at herself and patting her fur in a pretty good impersonation of you. Her search reveals a burr, which she pops in her mouth and crunches with gusto.

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops snorts in obvious irritation.

> scratch notoceratops with stick
The stick seems long enough to get at Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's itchy spot, but you just can't make yourself approach the frightening beast. It's huge and looks like it could bite or step on you at any moment.

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops flails its head towards its back in obvious frustration.

> press button
(the GPS)
You push the button and your current latitude and longitude display: 46° 10' 58" S, 179° 12' 33" W.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, her interest indicated by her perked ears and unblinking stare. She watches you pushing the GPS with interest, trying to see exactly what you're doing and how it works.

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops flops on the ground and writhes around desperately.

> press radio button
You can't see anything by that name here.

> i
You are carrying:
an a GPS (powered)
a chunk of bark
a map
a field radio
a leaky bucket, currently empty
a stick
a blob of sticky gum

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, showing her interest by her twitching tail and unconscious chittering. She watches you taking stock of your possessions, then starts looking at herself and patting her fur in a pretty good impersonation of you. Her search reveals an unidentifiable bit of something, which she pops in her mouth and crunches with gusto.

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops snorts in obvious frustration.

> press radio
You click the transmitter. "Can I ask you a question, Eruera?"

"Sure, Tim. What would you like to talk about?"

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently. She makes a few halfhearted motions, trying to imitate calling Eruera on the field radio, but quickly gives up and returns to watching you.

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops flails its head towards its back in obvious irritation.

(You could ask him about the captain , the coastal cutter , the battery , the glory , the GPS , the egg , the map , Neil The Nasty Notoceratops , Aotearoa , the poachers , your vision , or the Conservation Service .)

> ask eruera about notoceratops
"There's one of the big dinosaurs up here. The notoceratops."

Eruera chuckles a bit. "I hope you didn't run into it literally , Tim." You smile, even though it's not that funny. "And the great one did not chase you away?"

"No, it didn't." There's a slight pause before he continues.

"That is -- surprising. It takes both a special attitude and strong mana to approach the great taniwha . It is normally something that must be cultivated over time. That you have this gift is... interesting."

You continue. "It looks like it might be itchy or something -- it keeps rolling around and rubbing against the rocks in the same area I need to climb up."

"That is odd, Tim. It might have a fungus or other skin condition. You could probably try to scratch it. That won't fix the taniwha's problem permanently, but it might give it some relief so you could get past it."

"Yeah, Eruera, I thought of that. But... it's... so big ! It could crush me like a bug if it wanted to."

Eruera is silent for a moment. "I think I see. Let me tell you a brief story that might help you out. It's a legend about how the Māori first learned to tame the taniwha ."

You wait, and in a moment he starts. "Long ago, the people came to Māui with a problem. 'Every year we plant kūmara -- sweet potatoes -- and take great care to guard them. We build tall fences to keep away the pūkeko -- the swamp hen -- and the old men chase them away night and day. Every year the kūmara grow, and every year we prepare for the harvest. And every year, the great taniwha come, break down the fences, and ravage our crop. We try to fight and chase them away, but they charge with heads down and scatter us like raindrops!'

They pleaded with Māui to help them. 'We cannot continue to live when the taniwha eat most of our crops. Please, slay these taniwha and you may have anything you want as a reward.'

Māui agreed, saying 'I will end the threat of these taniwha for you,' for he had heard stories of the giant taniwha and had a plan."

Eruera pauses for a moment to catch his breath, then continues. "Māui lived among the people of the village as their honored guest all year, and there was much grumbling as the year went on, for Māui ate very well indeed and food was scarce.

But finally the harvest drew near, and Māui set forth for the fields to confront the taniwha . The villagers were confused, as he took no weapon, only a large sack. 'How can he slay the taniwha without a spear?' they asked themselves, and the grumbling grew greater. Finally the villagers sent a small boy to follow Māui to make sure he did what he had agreed to do and didn't just run away.

The boy saw something amazing. As the first of the taniwha approached, Māui stood still and silent. The taniwha stopped. Māui moved very slowly and smoothly, giving no offense to the great beast, and it didn't charge. Māui was able to walk right up to it and put his hand on it. Then Māui opened the bag, and inside were the kūmara he'd pretended to stuff himself with all year. As the boy watched, Māui pulled out a kūmara and fed it to the taniwha ."

Eruera pauses for a few moments. "Hours later, the boy came running back into the village. But before he could explain what he had seen to the elders, Māui appeared, riding proudly on the back of the great taniwha , and tossed down the empty sack. The elders were furious. 'You agreed to slay the taniwha , and you bring it here into our village?'

'I never promised to slay the taniwha ,' Māui responded. 'I have done what I promised. Remember my words. I have ended the threat of these taniwha to you.' The elders remembered, and although they were still furious, they had to agree that Māui had succeeded."

Eruera concludes, "So the point of that story is that these taniwha react well to friendliness. Approach them slowly and respectfully, and work out a way to scratch this one's itch, and you should be quite safe."

"Wow, Eruera, that's a cool story." You pause for a moment, thinking. It makes sense. But you do have one question. "So what did Māui choose as his reward?"

You can hear the smile in Eruera's voice. "That is a story for another time, Tim. Good luck to you!"

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops snorts in obvious frustration.

> scratch notoceratops with stick
You approach Neil The Nasty Notoceratops very slowly and deliberately with the stick, ready to back away if it shows any aggression. But it doesn't seem to treat you as a threat. Your heart pounds as you get close to the twitching beast, but finally you're in range. You reach upwards with the stick, toward where you've deduced the itchy spot must be. It seems that you've guessed correctly, as the huge beast immediately flops down on the ground and tilts its back towards you to improve the angle. Once your heart settles down after the huge dinosaur's abrupt movement, you scratch away as hard as you can, and Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's satisfied grunts indicate that it, at least, thinks you're doing a good job. You study the impressive creature as you work, fascinated with its sheer size and power.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia looks at you curiously. She seems to be impressed.

...but you're completely surprised when a deep voice from behind you says "Awww, isn't that cute ?"

You whirl around to see who it could be and end up with a rifle barrel pressed into your stomach by a tall, brown-haired man in jungle camouflage. "Just stay right there, boy," the man says. "You speak English?" He plucks the radio out of your hands and looks at it briefly, noting the identifying markings on it. "Working with the Conservation Service, eh? I don't know where you came from, but you aren't going to be going back to tell them about us."

He flicks one hand at the dinosaur without taking his eyes off you, and several other men in similar clothing move around you toward Neil The Nasty Notoceratops, who lumbers to its feet, far too slow to avoid capture. Or so it seems. One of the men raises what looks like another rifle and points it at the beast, but at the last moment Nancy The Naughty Nanakia rushes from the undergrowth and hurtles onto him, scrambling up his back before leaping to the lower branches of a nearby tree and disappearing again. The man jerks as he pulls the trigger, and a tranquilizer dart goes wide, flying into the forest in a high arc.

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops surges to its feet, bellows, and crashes off through the forest as the leader curses. With a curt gesture, he motions for the men to return and tie you up instead. "Those bloody pests! Well, at least we know that big dino's still around here. It won't escape us for long. In the meantime, you can take its spot in the cages." He smiles. "You never know when a Conservation Service hostage might come in handy." The man's rifle butt whips up towards the side of your head, and you see a blinding, red flash of pain, followed by blackness.

Please press SPACE to continue.

You awaken with a pounding headache, and your friend Nancy The Naughty Nanakia licking your temple with a raspy tongue. You can't tell whether it's the sandpaper sensation or the rank smell of her breath that succeeded in waking you, but you stagger to your feet and look around.

Cage
You're in a large, solidly-constructed steel cage. If the roka on the ground wasn't enough to tell you what these cages normally contain, the intermittent bellowing from the captured notoceratops in the four other cages makes it crystal clear. The locked door of the cage leads north, if you could somehow get it open.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, slipping back and forth through the bars to demonstrate to you how to leave the cell. She periodically looks at you to see what you are going to do next.

> save
Ok.

> score
You have so far scored 8 out of a possible 12, in 280 turns.

> x door
(the cage door)
The cage door, like the cage itself, is sturdy and solid, if not quite new. The bars are just slightly bent, which makes sense since they've been keeping live, agitated notoceratops in them. Unfortunately, the bend in the bars isn't enough to allow you to slip through like Nancy The Naughty Nanakia can. There's a lock mechanism on the door that looks like you could reach it.

As you take a step you notice something flash at your feet. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia pounces on it and comes up with something that looks like a snippet of thick copper wire.

> x lock
You can't see the lock mechanism, but you feel around the outside enough to find the keyhole. It seems simple -- turn the key and the lock bolt should slide back and unlock the door. But you don't have the key.

> pick lock with wire
You wait for a moment when no one is watching and start to work. With determination, you insert the copper wire and fiddle with the lock. The wire snippet is pretty stiff, and long enough to access the lock mechanism, but you have no real idea how to pick a lock, and all your fumbling does is attract attention. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you intently, head cocked, trying to figure out what you're doing. And unfortunately, you're so engaged in trying to open the lock and fending off the "assistance" of Nancy The Naughty Nanakia that you don't notice the apparent leader of the poachers -- the man who hit you -- approach.

"Well now, what's this?" He grabs your hand, painfully twisting the piece of wire free. "Oho, we've got Junior MacGyver here!"

He grips your hand, holding on effortlessly as you try to twist away, and considers. "Amusing, son. But if I see you doing that again I'm going to shoot you, just on the off chance you might get lucky." He drops the piece of copper wire onto the ground, out of your reach.

"Now behave, hear?" He turns on his heel and walks off.

> nanakia, get wire
You speak, but Nancy The Naughty Nanakia doesn't respond.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia seems drawn to the piece of copper wire. She slips through the bars of the cage, unnoticed, and picks the snippet up. She then turns it over and over in her hands, watching how it shines in the light.

> i
You are carrying nothing.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia moves over to the door lock and inserts the piece of wire, imitating what she saw you do before. She wiggles the wire around for a while, but to no effect, and she finally sits down in confusion.

> x me
You're a bit taller than average for your age, with dark brown hair and green eyes. Your clothes are heavy with salt and you can taste it on your lips. Your skin feels raw and your muscles are stiff and sore. But you're alive, and nothing's broken.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia cocks her head and looks quizzically at the door, considering its lock and the piece of wire. You can almost see the wheels turning in her head. After a while, she glances over at the tent the leader entered.

> x tent
This tent's heavy, waterproof canvas seems in the best condition of anything in the camp. It's smaller than the army-surplus tent to the southwest, but still looks roomy enough to provide a good amount of living space and headroom.

All of a sudden, Nancy The Naughty Nanakia takes off across the center of the camp to the north and disappears into the tent there.

> z
You wait near the door of the cage to see what Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is going to do next...

> z
You wait near the door of the cage to see what Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is going to do next...

> l
Cage
You're in a large, solidly-constructed steel cage. If the roka on the ground wasn't enough to tell you what these cages normally contain, the intermittent bellowing from the captured notoceratops in the four other cages makes it crystal clear. The locked door of the cage leads north, if you could somehow get it open.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia bounds out of the tent, carrying something shiny! You squint to look more closely as she approaches, and realize with a start that it's the key to the lock! Nancy The Naughty Nanakia must have stolen it without being detected! She sprints across the central area of camp and leaps up onto the door of your cell, then jams the key into the lock and starts moving it around. Somewhere in all the twisting and poking, you hear a "click".

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia looks up at you and wiggles in excitement. She keeps making scooting motions with her head to try to direct you toward the cage door.

> save
Ok.

> open door
(the cage door)
You open the cage door.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, curiosity evident from her tilted head and fixed gaze. She watches with interest, trying to see how the cage door operates.

Yes I am in something at the moment.

> out
But you aren't in anything at the moment.

> n

Center of Camp
You slip out the cage door with care, grateful that the door hadn't made much noise when you opened it. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia jumps excitedly as you come out, and then scoots over to the other cages and quickly unlocks those as well. The notoceratops in the other cells waste little time pushing through the doors and heading for the hills. Unfortunately, they trumpet and bellow in triumph as they go. You can hear shouts from the alerted poachers around camp as the notoceratops scatter, but in the confusion no one has yet noticed your escape. You look to the east, towards the boats, but in a stroke of very bad luck you notice two men off in that direction pointing at the dinosaurs and starting to run in your direction.

This seems to be the center of the poachers' encampment. A banked campfire is in the center of a small cleared space here, a small, newer tent is set up to the north, and a collection of large cages is set to the south. To the east, a short trail leads down a slope to a beach, where the poachers keep their boats.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, trying to lead the way to the west as she flies over obstacles with amazing speed.

The formerly-imprisoned notoceratops spread out quickly and rampage around camp, trying to find their way out and avoiding the poachers who are trying to round them back up. Luckily, no one seems to have spotted you yet, although the men from the east are steadily approaching.

> w

Poacher Camp
You set out to the west, hoping to use the exodus of the dinosaurs to cover your escape, and staying low. As you near the outskirts of camp, you duck behind a partially-disassembled jeep for some cover.

The poachers' camp borders the wilderness here. Deep ruts in the ground mark the likely spot where their vehicle is parked when it's not in use. One large tent lies to the south. To the northwest a crude road leads back into the forest, and you could also reach the forest to the southwest over a short rise and across a stretch of open field. The main portion of the camp is to the east.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, alternating between chittering anxiously at you and scampering up your leg to your shoulder, looking towards the southwest.

The dinosaurs are fleeing the camp, pursued by poachers with guns, who are piling into a jeep. Apparently (and certainly fortunately), no one has yet seen you.

> sw

Tree Screen
You set out across the open space to the southeast, staying low and heading for the treeline, still unseen. And it seems to be going well until one of the men gets bowled over by a notoceratops and sees you as he gets back to his feet.

"Hey! That kid's loose! He's getting away! Get him!"

You've never been happier to see the thick forest -- you've got a good chance of losing your pursuers in here, you figure. The grasses of the slope to the northeast give way to ferns and kauri trees as the animal trail leads off into the shaded forest to the west.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, trying to lead the way to the west as she flies over obstacles with amazing speed.

You hear shouts from your pursuers. "He's getting away! Faster, dammit!"

> w

Debris Slope
You dash up the animal trail, trying to keep distance over your pursuers, but they're much fresher and do a good job of keeping up with you. You burst from the undergrowth near the slope of scree.

To the west, a very shallow slope of mixed scree and debris leads up to the bank of the mountain stream. At the bottom, where you stand, the forest thickens again, with faint animal trails leading north into the deeper forest and east towards the thinner trees that line the coast. By keeping close to the streambank, you could also manage to follow the water southeast down toward the shore.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, zigzagging back and forth as you run and occasionally surging towards the north before returning to circle you again.

A large boulder stands out from the rest of the mixed rock and debris. It's remarkable for being particularly round.

The pursuing men aren't shouting any more, but you can hear them crashing through the ferns and undergrowth. They're not far behind you.

> push boulder
Sure enough, it rolls fairly easily. You push it to and fro, aimlessly, getting a feel for it.

The crashing gets louder and you can see the undergrowth tremble. "I can see you, boy!"

> push boulder e
A tall knot of roots lies across the path in that direction. You can't quite lever the boulder over them.

The crashing gets louder and you can see the undergrowth tremble. "I can see you, boy!"

> lever boulder with stick
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> lever boulder
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> push boulder down
It makes no sense to push the boulder in that direction.

The crashing gets louder and you can see the undergrowth tremble. "I can see you, boy!"

> push boulder e
A tall knot of roots lies across the path in that direction. You can't quite lever the boulder over them.

The crashing gets louder and you can see the undergrowth tremble. "I can see you, boy!"

> x roots
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> push boulder w
You're nowhere near strong enough to get the boulder up the hill.

The crashing gets louder and you can see the undergrowth tremble. "I can see you, boy!"

> i
You are carrying nothing.

They say that he who hesitates is lost, and that describes you fairly well. Your momentary hesitation allows the pursuing poachers to catch up and capture you. What happens afterwards is not pretty.

*** The End ***

In that game you scored 9 out of a possible 12, in 301 turns.

Would you like to RESTART, RESTORE a saved game, QUIT, or UNDO the last command?
>
undo
Debris Slope
[Previous turn undone.]

> w
You head up the slope, but the slope is steep and your pursuers are close. A lucky shot slams into your back and sends you sprawling, and it's all over for you.

*** The End ***

In that game you scored 9 out of a possible 12, in 301 turns.

Would you like to RESTART, RESTORE a saved game, QUIT, or UNDO the last command?
>
restore
Ok.

> l
Cage
You're in a large, solidly-constructed steel cage. If the roka on the ground wasn't enough to tell you what these cages normally contain, the intermittent bellowing from the captured notoceratops in the four other cages makes it crystal clear. The locked door of the cage leads north, if you could somehow get it open.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, hanging around the door of the cage, alternating significant looks between you and the door.

> open door
(the cage door)
You open the cage door.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia watches you, her interest indicated by her perked ears and unblinking stare. She watches with interest, trying to see how the cage door operates.

> n

Center of Camp
You slip out the cage door with care, grateful that the door hadn't made much noise when you opened it. Nancy The Naughty Nanakia jumps excitedly as you come out, and then scoots over to the other cages and quickly unlocks those as well. The notoceratops in the other cells waste little time pushing through the doors and heading for the hills. Unfortunately, they trumpet and bellow in triumph as they go. You can hear shouts from the alerted poachers around camp as the notoceratops scatter, but in the confusion no one has yet noticed your escape. You look to the east, towards the boats, but in a stroke of very bad luck you notice two men off in that direction pointing at the dinosaurs and starting to run in your direction.

This seems to be the center of the poachers' encampment. A banked campfire is in the center of a small cleared space here, a small, newer tent is set up to the north, and a collection of large cages is set to the south. To the east, a short trail leads down a slope to a beach, where the poachers keep their boats.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, zigzagging back and forth as you run and occasionally surging towards the west before returning to circle you again.

The formerly-imprisoned notoceratops spread out quickly and rampage around camp, trying to find their way out and avoiding the poachers who are trying to round them back up. Luckily, no one seems to have spotted you yet, although the men from the east are steadily approaching.

> w

Poacher Camp
You set out to the west, hoping to use the exodus of the dinosaurs to cover your escape, and staying low. As you near the outskirts of camp, you duck behind a partially-disassembled jeep for some cover.

The poachers' camp borders the wilderness here. Deep ruts in the ground mark the likely spot where their vehicle is parked when it's not in use. One large tent lies to the south. To the northwest a crude road leads back into the forest, and you could also reach the forest to the southwest over a short rise and across a stretch of open field. The main portion of the camp is to the east.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, trying to lead the way to the southwest as she flies over obstacles with amazing speed.

The dinosaurs are fleeing the camp, pursued by poachers with guns, who are piling into a jeep. Apparently (and certainly fortunately), no one has yet seen you.

> sw

Tree Screen
You set out across the open space to the southeast, staying low and heading for the treeline, still unseen. And it seems to be going well until one of the men gets bowled over by a notoceratops and sees you as he gets back to his feet.

"Hey! That kid's loose! He's getting away! Get him!"

You've never been happier to see the thick forest -- you've got a good chance of losing your pursuers in here, you figure. The grasses of the slope to the northeast give way to ferns and kauri trees as the animal trail leads off into the shaded forest to the west.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, zigzagging back and forth as you run and occasionally surging towards the west before returning to circle you again.

You hear shouts from your pursuers. "He's getting away! Faster, dammit!"

> w

Debris Slope
You dash up the animal trail, trying to keep distance over your pursuers, but they're much fresher and do a good job of keeping up with you. You burst from the undergrowth near the slope of scree.

To the west, a very shallow slope of mixed scree and debris leads up to the bank of the mountain stream. At the bottom, where you stand, the forest thickens again, with faint animal trails leading north into the deeper forest and east towards the thinner trees that line the coast. By keeping close to the streambank, you could also manage to follow the water southeast down toward the shore.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, trying to lead the way to the north as she flies over obstacles with amazing speed.

A large boulder stands out from the rest of the mixed rock and debris. It's remarkable for being particularly round.

The pursuing men aren't shouting any more, but you can hear them crashing through the ferns and undergrowth. They're not far behind you.

> n

Moa Nest
Turning abruptly, you head for the north at a dead sprint, bursting into the moa's hollow, causing her to squawk in alarm before she recognizes you. Your lungs are burning and you aren't sure how long you can keep this pace up.

The trail descends into a hollow here, free of trees. Centered in the valley floor is a large mound of volcanic rock, venting what looks like smoke or steam from a fumarole on top. The surrounding rock is riddled with cracks, crevices, and fissures, and hidden in one of the larger depressions is a very large bird's nest, which doesn't look completely intact. The forest trail leads upslope to both the north and south.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia is nearby, alternating between chittering anxiously at you and scampering up your leg to your shoulder, looking towards the north.

Millicent The Majestic Moa seems alert and agitated, but sticks near her nest and egg.

Behind you, a group of pursuers rushes into the hollow. This second disruption alarms Millicent The Majestic Moa, who stands, draws herself up to her full twelve feet of height, and challenges the newcomers from her nest. The poachers ignore the bird, instead pointing at you and calling out in excitement. "There he is! Grab that kid!"

> n

Forest Clearing
You skirt the fumarole, heading farther up the trail toward the deeper forest, and although your exhausted body keeps telling you there's no way you'll make it, you keep pushing forward anyway. Unfortunately, the main danger isn't behind you.

" Kai a te kurī ! Gotcha, you little troublemaker!" A tall Māori man wearing camouflage clothing and carrying a rifle rounds the corner directly ahead of you and grabs your shoulder, crunching the bones painfully. Almost before you realize what's happening, Nancy The Naughty Nanakia leaps onto your shoulder with a great bound and sinks her sharp little teeth into the man's hand! " Āhahā , what the hell?"

He whips his hand off your shoulder to smack little Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, evoking a screech of rage. You twist free, sprinting towards the forest to the north, hoping there aren't any more poachers ahead of you on the trail.

The narrow forest trail opens onto a small clearing here, where the kauri gives way to unhealthy-looking ferns and thin, yellowish grass. The trail leaves the clearing to both north and south.

As you continue, you hear a shout of rage, and then a horrible, high-pitched squeal of pain. Despite your desperation, you slow for a second and risk a quick glance behind you. No sign of Nancy The Naughty Nanakia.

I hope she's OK. If she can just get into the trees she should be fine ...

> save
Ok.

> n

Deep Forest
You keep running, glancing to the side and over your shoulder, hoping to catch a glimpse of brown fur or beady yellow eyes, but you don't see anything. The forest seems silent, aside from the breath burning in and out of your lungs as you keep running north, heading for the defile you found earlier.

The breeze blowing the tops of the thickly-clustered kauri makes the few flashes of light dance and whirl around you. The trail is all but lost here. A tall, sheer, charcoal-gray ridge stretches as far as you can see from the east to the west.

Neil The Nasty Notoceratops stands here, complacent and slowly munching plants with its powerful jaws as it watches you arrive, at a run and out of breath. It holds your gaze for a few eternal seconds, then slowly kneels down, as if in invitation.

You stumble to a stop in front of the dinosaur. Maybe it's the fatigue blurring your vision, but you seem to see it with a strange kind of double vision -- as the powerful lord of the forest, but also as the Māori do -- as an avenging spirit, the taniwha , the protector of the land. You and Neil The Nasty Notoceratops hold motionless, watching each other for what seems like hours, but eventually the sounds of cursing men crashing through the ferns breaks the spell.

> notoceratops, kill
(Neil The Nasty Notoceratops)
You speak, but Neil The Nasty Notoceratops doesn't respond.

You and the dinosaur are still observing each other, motionless, as the sounds of search and pursuit get closer.

> n
Skirting Neil The Nasty Notoceratops, you head for the defile to make your escape. Unfortunately, the broken, sharp rocks slow your progress enough for your pursuers to catch up, and one of them snaps off a shot. The shock makes you lose your grip on the rocks, and you fall to the ground, gravely wounded.

*** The End ***

In that game you scored 9 out of a possible 12, in 300 turns.

Would you like to RESTART, RESTORE a saved game, QUIT, or UNDO the last command?
>
undo
Deep Forest
[Previous turn undone.]

> get on notoceratops
As you approach Neil The Nasty Notoceratops -- the taniwha -- it feels inevitable. Even destined. You may be running for your life, but as you near the massive dinosaur there's a timeless moment when you can forget that -- can feel something like what those Māori warriors of legend must have felt before charging into battle on the backs of beasts just like this one.

As if in a dream, you climb up onto the taniwha 's back. It seems high up, and that's before it stands, but for once you aren't afraid, and it feels so good to leave that fear back on the ground. You can actually see that little Māori boy from your visions sitting on the beast's back along with you, even though you know he can't be real. He has a wild grin on his face, and when you see it, you feel a thrill of contagious excitement. As it rises, the power and size of the beast you ride makes you feel like a superhero, or a Greek demigod like Hercules.

(While riding Neil The Nasty Notoceratops, you can try to control its movements. Use the command FASTER to urge it to greater speed, SLOWER to try to slow it down, and LEFT and RIGHT to try to shift the direction it's moving in.)

Deep Forest (on Neil The Nasty Notoceratops, facing east and stopped)
The breeze blowing the tops of the thickly-clustered
kauri makes the few flashes of light dance and whirl around you. The trail is all but lost here. A tall, sheer, charcoal-gray ridge stretches as far as you can see from the east to the west.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> save
Ok.

> left
You reach forward, lean to your left, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the left. It slowly complies, turning to the northeast. Then it shakes its head and knocks your hand loose.

> left
You reach forward, lean to your left, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the left. It reluctantly comes around to the north. It then lowers its head to munch a few ferns.

> faster
With determination, you give Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's flanks a bit of a kick, like you were riding a horse. Unfortunately, it's currently looking in the direction of the rock wall, and so it just sits there, unmoving.

> left
You reach forward, lean to your left, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the left. It slowly turns to the northwest. It tosses its head a bit in apparent frustration.

> left
You reach forward, lean to your left, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the left. It reluctantly comes around to the west, parallel to the rock wall. Then it shakes its head and knocks your hand loose.

> left
You reach forward, lean to your left, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the left. It slowly veers to the southwest. It snorts in mild irritation.

> left
You reach forward, lean to your left, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the left. It grumpily turns to the south. Afterwards, it calmly starts to munch some ferns.

> faster
Although you're somewhat afraid of irritating it, you give Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's flanks a bit of a kick, like you were riding a horse. For a moment, Neil The Nasty Notoceratops doesn't move -- just stands there -- and a moment of doubt creeps in. What if the poachers find you while you're still just standing here? But then the beast lurches and you grab for a better handhold. It's stomping the ground with massive impacts, alternating sides and tossing its head, dancing a war-dance -- its own haka . It starts off at a walk, headed to the south. But after a short period of time, Neil The Nasty Notoceratops seems to hear something up ahead and balks.

> faster
With some nervousness, you give Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's flanks a bit of a kick, like you were riding a horse. It starts off at a walk, headed to the south. But after a short period of time, Neil The Nasty Notoceratops seems to hear something up ahead and balks.

> left
You reach forward, lean to your left, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the left. It reluctantly veers to the southeast. It snorts in mild irritation.

> left
You reach forward, lean to your left, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the left. It slowly comes around to the east, parallel to the rock wall. It then lowers its head to munch a few ferns.

> faster
With determination, you give Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's flanks a bit of a kick, like you were riding a horse. It starts walking at a meandering pace, paralleling the rock wall.

> faster
Although you're somewhat afraid of irritating it, you urge Neil The Nasty Notoceratops to greater speed with another kick. It speeds up to a trot, jolting your body with each impact of its feet, still paralleling the rock wall.

> faster
With determination, you kick again, hoping to spur Neil The Nasty Notoceratops out of its jolting trot. Unfortunately, the notoceratops doesn't seem to want to go any faster in the thick forest.

> faster
Although you're somewhat afraid of irritating it, you kick again, hoping to spur Neil The Nasty Notoceratops out of its jolting trot. Unfortunately, the notoceratops doesn't seem to want to go any faster in the thick forest.

> z
You hold on and allow Neil The Nasty Notoceratops to continue doing what it's doing.
>
z
You hold on and allow Neil The Nasty Notoceratops to continue doing what it's doing.
>
z
You hold on and allow Neil The Nasty Notoceratops to continue doing what it's doing.
>
z
You hold on and allow Neil The Nasty Notoceratops to continue doing what it's doing.
>
faster
With determination, you kick again, hoping to spur Neil The Nasty Notoceratops out of its jolting trot. Unfortunately, the notoceratops doesn't seem to want to go any faster in the thick forest.

> faster
With some nervousness, you kick again, hoping to spur Neil The Nasty Notoceratops out of its jolting trot. Unfortunately, the notoceratops doesn't seem to want to go any faster in the thick forest.

> faster
Although you're somewhat afraid of irritating it, you kick again, hoping to spur Neil The Nasty Notoceratops out of its jolting trot. Unfortunately, the notoceratops doesn't seem to want to go any faster in the thick forest.

> right
You reach forward, lean to your right, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the right. It reluctantly turns to the southeast, crashing through undergrowth and jarring you with each step. As you continue, you come across ruts in the ground that were obviously made by vehicles, and before long you're following the wide trail back toward the poacher camp.

They almost got me in the forest; my only chance is to get through to the shore where their boats are...

From up ahead, you see the glow of headlights. In a moment, it resolves into one of the poachers' jeeps bouncing over the rutted trail.

> faster
With some nervousness, you kick again, hoping to spur Neil The Nasty Notoceratops out of its jolting trot. It responds, speeding up to a full, charging run! You can barely hold on as it hurtles onward toward the poacher camp.

Poacher Camp (on Neil The Nasty Notoceratops, facing southeast and running)
The poachers' camp borders the wilderness here. Deep ruts in the ground mark the likely spot where their vehicle is parked when it's not in use. One large tent lies to the south. To the northwest a crude road leads back into the forest, and you could also reach the forest to the southwest over a short rise and across a stretch of open field. The main portion of the camp is to the east.

One of the remaining jeeps roars into life, several armed men hanging on as the driver spins the wheel and tries to cut you off. The jeep is just to the left of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head, blocking the way into the center of the poacher encampment.

> save
Ok.

> right
You reach forward, lean to your right, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the right. For a moment you're not sure it's going to cooperate, but at the last minute Neil The Nasty Notoceratops veers off to the south, headed for the large barracks tent. You hear a few gunshots behind you, but they don't seem to hit you. You barrel though the tent, pulling the heavy fabric down and quickly ensnaring even the powerful notoceratops. You don't get a chance to find out what the poachers might do to you, as Neil The Nasty Notoceratops, in its futile thrashing attempts to escape, crushes the life out of you.

*** The End ***

In that game you scored 10 out of a possible 12, in 325 turns.

Would you like to RESTART, RESTORE a saved game, QUIT, or UNDO the last command?
>
undo
Poacher Camp
[Previous turn undone.]

> left
You reach forward, lean to your left, and try to pull the bony plate of Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's head to get it to go to the left. For a moment you're not sure it's going to cooperate -- that it's finally had enough of you tugging and prodding at it -- but at the last minute Neil The Nasty Notoceratops lowers its massive head, puts on an extra burst of speed, bellows in fury, and charges to the left. You catch one glimpse of the men on the jeep, eyes wide, raising their hands in a futile instinctive attempt to ward off the charging beast. And then you're upon them, Neil The Nasty Notoceratops's bony head slamming into the side of the jeep with a tremendous crash as you brace against the shock. The impact knocks the jeep clear over onto its side and sends men sprawling in all directions! You're thrown forward by the impact and take quite a thump from the back of the dinosaur's bony head plate. You start to slip off to the right, but manage to hang on -- barely -- with one hand.

The jeep's engine cuts out with a heavy sound of clunking metal, and before any of the men can even lift their heads from the ground, you and Neil The Nasty Notoceratops barrel east into the center of the camp.

Center of Camp
Neil The Nasty Notoceratops barrels into the center of the camp in a berserk fury, charging at the tents and lashing out at the cages, whirling and stomping in a frenzy. You hold on for dear life, but when the taniwha rears and twists almost completely around, your grip loosens and you spin to the ground in a painful heap. You scramble to the side to avoid being trampled.

This seems to be the center of the poachers' encampment. A banked campfire is in the center of a small cleared space here, a small, newer tent is set up to the north, and a collection of large cages is set to the south. To the east, a short trail leads down a slope to a beach, where the poachers keep their boats.

In the general chaos you think you might again slip away unnoticed, but one of the cowering poachers to the west has apparently spotted you and is moving to intercept as Neil The Nasty Notoceratops continues its destructive frenzy. You quickly shift to the side to avoid being stepped on, and consider your possible escape routes.

> save
Ok.

> e

North Beach
You scramble in what seems to be the only safe direction -- down towards the beach. In all the confusion, you can't see whether you're being followed or not, but the chaos won't last forever. You scan the shoreline, evaluating your possible escape options.

This thin beach of grey sand curves around a shallow bay, with rough, broken rock blocking travel to the north and south. Waves lap at the shore in the mild breeze, rocking the boats moored here. A path rises up to the west towards the poachers' camp.

A fairly large and weathered transport ship is here, partially hidden under frayed camouflage netting.

A small speedboat, patched and covered with camouflage netting, is beached on the strand nearby.

As you move toward the shoreline, the poacher you noticed earlier crests the top of the ridge, rifle slung over his back. He scans the shore, stops when he sees you, and starts down at a jog, unlimbering his weapon.

> launch speedboat
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> push speedboat
It is fixed in place.

The armed man continues to amble towards you, rifle at the ready. "It's all over. Get over here and I won't shoot you!" Somehow, you're not particularly tempted to follow his orders.

> undo
North Beach
[Previous turn undone.]

> get in speedboar
That noun did not make sense in this context.

> get in speedboat
You climb into the speedboat and glance around to familiarize yourself with the controls.

The speedboat looks like it's seen better days -- its hull has been patched in numerous places and it's been covered with camouflage netting to keep it hidden. The motor looks pretty big, though. You're in a bit too much of a hurry to take much time going over the controls at this point, but the obvious ones include an ignition button and a steering wheel. A life preserver and attached coil of line sit at the aft end of the boat.

The armed man starts to run, visibly agitated. "Get away from the boats, kid!" He snaps a shot at you, but he's not that good at shooting on the run, and he misses.

> press ignition
Moving Into the Bay (in the speedboat)
You grit your teeth, hoping the motor is fueled and ready to go, and stab the red ignition button. After a couple seconds of grinding, the motor roars to life and a wave of relief washes over you. You ease the throttle lever up to a middling range and pull away from shore just as the man with the gun reaches the beach at a dead sprint and levels his rifle at you.

All of a sudden, you spot something small, furry and familiar sprinting through the poacher's legs and running toward the boat. As she reaches the shore, Nancy The Naughty Nanakia makes an impossible leap into the air, arms stretched out wide, towards the speedboat. And she almost makes it. She manages to grab at the back end of the boat, but ends up pulling the life preserver overboard and both she and it fall into the ocean.

As the boat moves out into the bay, Nancy The Naughty Nanakia and the life preserver float behind, but the line starts to silently spool out of its coil, and you notice the line's other end isn't tied to anything. In a short time, it and Nancy The Naughty Nanakia will be gone.

You glance back to shore, just in time to see the flash of a shot that apparently missed you, since you still seem to be alive.
The boat motors away from shore, further into the clear blue waters of the bay. The shoreline runs from north to south here, with nothing but the wide ocean to the east.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia, sopping wet and struggling, hangs onto the life preserver with a deathgrip as the boat pulls away. The line attached to the life preserver continues to spool smoothly into the sea as the distance increases, but there's still some left.

[Your score has just gone up by one point.]

> get line
Another shot sings past your ear as you pull the line, life preserver, and Nancy The Naughty Nanakia into the boat. Wasting no time, you hunch back to the seat, plant yourself, and slam the lever all the way to "H". The boat leaps forward, throwing water into the sky and pushing a huge wake out to the sides as you rocket out into the bay, leaving the poacher on shore with no shot but wild ones. You can feel a power -- strong mana surrounding you with destiny, and you know somehow that his shots will lack all potency against you.

Nancy The Naughty Nanakia scampers forward and leaps onto your shoulder, dripping seawater and chattering in ecstasy as you slew the craft towards the south. You know how it's going to be -- you'll make it back to Eruera, pick him up, and head for the closest Conservation Service coastal watch station. You know it, and as the air and sea rush past you, you seem to see the little Maori boy off on the horizon, smiling his wild, triumphant smile. You can feel his presence all the way as you roar down to the familiar shore where Eruera waits for you, waving and laughing in amazement, ready to hear your tale and leave this coast with you to find the station and rescue and, with luck, some justice.

*** The End ***

In that game you scored 12 out of a possible 12, in 329 turns.

Would you like to RESTART, RESTORE a saved game, QUIT, UNDO the last command, or read the EPILOGUE?
>
epilogue
"The helicopter's just ahead, Tim." Eruera's crutch slows him down just a bit, but you still have to trot a little to keep up. You stop at the edge of the clearing, and Eruera turns to you and gently lifts Nancy The Naughty Nanakia from your shoulder. "I'll take care of Nancy The Naughty Nanakia for you until next year, OK?" He smiles reassuringly and claps your shoulder. "And don't worry, she'll remember you! These little ones do not often take a liking to people, but once they do their loyalty is legendary."

You pet Nancy The Naughty Nanakia for a while, and she chirps and bleeks contentedly as you blink away some dust the helicopter must have kicked up when it landed. It's time, I guess. You shake Eruera's hand, turn away, and push through the growing wind as the helicopter's blades begin to spin up. As you approach, the pilot pushes the cockpit door open and beckons you aboard, a lopsided smile on his face. You step up, fasten your harness, and put on your helmet. Once the intercom is enabled, the pilot speaks. "So, you are the notorious Tim Cooper? The pākehā toa that caught the taniwha raiders?"

"Yes, I'm Tim."

The helicopter rises into the air and you wave at Eruera and Nancy The Naughty Nanakia as you tilt forward and pick up speed. " Kia ora , Tim! Good to have you aboard! We'll get you over to headquarters in about 45 minutes!" Very little time before you get to New Port Nelson and start your long hours of official debriefing and depositions.

You take a moment to reflect back on the last two weeks. The memories blur together, but your almost unrecognizable Program t-shirt reads like a diary -- rips and green stains from the amazing adventure of that first day, grease spots from the paua skewers you scarfed down at the crazy celebratory beach barbecue after your rescue, the giant mudstain when you skidded down thirty steep feet of Te Apiti ravine on your back and side, in hot pursuit of a group of spiny-backed taniwha .

The clearing is nothing but a light green dot in the darker green of the forest, far behind you, and you slump back in your seat. You can't believe it's over already; it seems like only a day or two since you got here. But you hold tight to one hope. Eruera was sure you could come back next year. "They're going to remember the name 'Tim Cooper'," he said, grinning. "I'll make sure of that! All you have to do is get your application in next year and you'll be on your way back." Back in the forest, back working with the taniwha and the Conservation Service. Back with Nancy The Naughty Nanakia. A year isn't so long to wait, right?

Would you like to RESTART, RESTORE a saved game, QUIT, UNDO the last command, or read the EPILOGUE?
>
restart

Welcome to Aotearoa !

Display Test:

Āā Ēē Īī Ōō Ūū

This is an interactive fiction story that uses both colored text and special, non-English letters, specifically Polynesian vowels with macrons (horizontal lines) over them.

If no words above were colored or emphasized,
or if you didn't see the characters as vowels with macrons,
or if you want to adjust the colors displayed,
or if you want to see interpreter compatibility information,
press
K now.

Press R to restore an existing story, or a number from 1 to 4 to start a new story...

1 ) ...with an in-game tutorial for new players, as well as color keyword highlighting in the text.
2 ) ...with an in-game tutorial for new players, but no keyword highlighting.
3 ) ...with no tutorial, but with color keyword highlighting in the text.
4 ) ...with no tutorial and no keyword highlighting.

The waka floats in the deep ocean, the sun motionless and searing in the clear sky. Māui, the trickster, casts his fishing line into the depths of the ocean, tied to his magic hook made from a human jawbone. Almost immediately the hook catches, and he pulls up an enormous fish that somehow becomes, as you watch, an entire continent. On that new continent magnificent dinosaurs -- taniwha -- prowl the dark forests. Volcanoes dim the sky with smoke and stain the air with the stench of sulfur, but the land is rich and fertile, and Māui's older brothers look on it with greed in their eyes. Māui watches them, deep in thought, with a faraway expression you can't read. Then he turns to look directly into your eyes, and says, "You know that some of my brothers cannot be trusted. You must keep them from carving up this great fish until I return from the gods with the proper karakia ."

And suddenly he's gone, flying away into the sun in the form of a seabird, and you're left floating in the waka with Māui's brothers as they smile secret half-smiles to each other and reach for their knives, and you wonder what in the world Māui thinks that you, twelve-year-old Tim Cooper, can do to stop them before they carve up and defile...

Please press SPACE to continue.

Aotearoa
An Interactive Adventure by Matt Wigdahl
Release 1 / Serial number 100928 / Inform 7 build 6E72 (I6/v6.31 lib 6/12N)
Difficulty Level:
Introductory Cruelty Level: Polite

*** First-time players should type ABOUT ***

A hand gently shakes your shoulder, and the in-flight magazine falls off your chest as you startle awake. "Sorry, Tim. We've arrived," the stewardess says, and passes on. But the dreams don't leave with her, and the rest of the trip passes in a haze: the terminal; the tall Māori man with fierce tattoos on his face who greets you on arrival; the trip through unfamiliar streets to a Conservation Service cutter. In a way it's a good thing. If you had to think about what you're getting yourself into, you might be too afraid to go through with it. You stand on the prow of the small ship, fear and excitement swirling around inside you so you can hardly tell them apart. You're going to see real, live dinosaurs, and that's great, but you're alone and afraid, and nothing is familiar here, and that's... not great.

The man, Eruera, walks up to stand beside you, taking in the same view, shading his eyes with a powerful hand as he looks forward. The whipping ocean wind tries to carry his words away, and his accent is thick, but he has a friendly, open smile. "Don't worry about your flight getting delayed. We'll catch you up to the other group in no time." He studies your face, sees the concern. "Come now, you must be excited to start, yes? Everyone is! You are ready to work?"

Excitement gets the upper hand for now and you grin just a bit -- you can't help it. "I still can't believe I got picked to come! I get to see real dinosaurs? That's so cool!"

Eruera laughs, a startling, wild sound. "You may not think it is quite so 'cool' after picking through dinosaur roka for a few days, Tim."

You cock your head a bit, not quite sure you understood. " Roka "?

He just looks back at you silently, the friendly grin growing a bit wider.

Oh .

The Prow
The cutter 's hydrofoil brings the ship high out of the water -- high enough that there's very little spray. The wind whips past as the boat glides across the ocean off the coast to port. Thick, deep green bands of forest snake along the coastline to port. The treeline tracks stretches of black sand beach , sharp cliffs of dark volcanic rock, and the occasional salt marsh . The ocean glares as you look at the shore, almost overpoweringly blue.

A dark feather from some sort of seabird flutters in the wind, caught in a small gap in the guardrail.

You hear an incomprehensible yell from the general direction of the bridge. Eruera turns toward it, then closes his eyes for an instant. "I told them to double-check those gaskets," he sighs. "I'd better go help them before we're dead in the water."

He starts to leave, then turns back to you for a moment. "Why don't you head to the bridge? They've got sandwiches in there; I'm sure you're hungry after all your traveling. I'll catch up with you after I sort things out below decks."

Eruera sprints off to aft.

[ You can get a fresh description of your surroundings at any time by pressing the ENTER key. Try it -- press the ENTER key now. (Or, if you don't need instructions, you can turn the tutorial off at any time by typing TUTORIAL MODE OFF . You can also skip a particular step at any time by typing SKIP .) ]

>
[
Excellent! If you like, you can also use the traditional commands of LOOK or L to achieve the same effect -- they will all print a description of your environment, like so: ]

The Prow
The cutter 's hydrofoil brings the ship high out of the water -- high enough that there's very little spray. The wind whips past as the boat glides across the ocean off the coast to port. Thick, deep green bands of forest snake along the coastline to port. The treeline tracks stretches of black sand beach , sharp cliffs of dark volcanic rock, and the occasional salt marsh . The ocean glares as you look at the shore, almost overpoweringly blue.

A dark feather from some sort of seabird flutters in the wind, caught in a small gap in the guardrail.

[ Individual objects have descriptions, too. You can find out more by examining them. The easiest way to do this is to simply type their names at the command prompt, like so: COASTLINE. ]

> about

> Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
> Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
> Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
> Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
> Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
> Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
> Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
> About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
> About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Matt Wigdahl is a husband, a father of three children, a software engineer, a racquetball player, a gamer, an amateur historian, a very amateur cook, and an avid reader. He's been a fan of interactive fiction since his high-school days, when he beta-tested several titles for Infocom. This is his second work of interactive fiction. His website is at http://www.wigdahl.net/quern.

Please press SPACE to continue.

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
> About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
> About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
> Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
> Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Thanks to all the people who have helped make this game a reality! First off, thanks to my family for supporting me in this often time-consuming endeavor.

Profound thanks also go to Graham Nelson and Emily Short, for creating the Inform 7 development environment and its rich documentation, and to Andrew Plotkin, the developer of the Glulx engine that powers this game. Thanks for enabling the creativity of so many people!

Special thanks to Sam Kabo Ashwell and Aaron A. Reed, who gave truly invaluable assistance with many, many writing, plotline, and game design issues; and Erik Temple, who helped me past several problems I had with I6 and glk.

Thanks also to the authors of the many excellent extensions I've used, for your contributions to Inform 7's development community:

Standard Rules version 2/090402 by Graham Nelson
Rideable Vehicles version 3 by Graham Nelson
Exit Lister version 9 by Eric Eve
Glulx Text Effects version 3 by Emily Short
Epistemology version 6 by Eric Eve
Keywords for Conversation version 2 by Matt Wigdahl
Numbered Disambiguation Choices version 3 by Aaron Reed
Smarter Parser version 5 by Aaron Reed
Remembering version 3 by Aaron Reed
Flexible Windows version 9 by Jon Ingold (with contributions by Erik Temple)
Object Response Tests version 4 by Juhana Leinonen
Default Messages version 11/090530 by David Fisher
Conversation Package version 2 by Eric Eve
Keyword Interface version 4 by Aaron Reed
Conversation Nodes version 5 by Eric Eve
Conversation Suggestions version 4 by Eric Eve
Conversation Responses version 5 by Eric Eve
Conversational Defaults version 2 by Eric Eve
Conversation Framework version 8 by Eric Eve
(I also used a heavily-modified version of Emily Short's Tutorial Mode)

Of course, thanks to my corps of beta testers:

Sam Kabo Ashwell, Aaron A. Reed, Matt Woodall, Faith Knowles, Michael Blankowski, Garrett Goebel, Maddy Goebel, Alex Goebel, Joel Webster, and Poster.

Testing hardware for Mac builds was kindly provided by Matt Funk.

And finally, thanks to the interactive fiction community as a whole, which includes some of the nicest, most fun, and most helpful people I've ever met. Thanks for keeping IF alive!

Please press SPACE to continue.

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
> Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
> Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
> Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
> Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
> Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
> Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
> About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
> About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

> Alternate History
Alternate Fauna

In our world, the microcontinent of Zealandia -- then part of Australia -- split off from Antarctica 120 million years ago. 80 million years ago it split off from Australia, and over the next 55 million years or so it slowly sank below sea level until only 7% of it remained above the water. Most of that dry land was comprised of what we now know as the North and South Islands of New Zealand.

In the alternate history of the game Aotearoa , the crust of Zealandia was thicker -- approximately 24 kilometers thick rather than the 20 kilometers it is in our world. This allowed the continent to ride higher on the mantle and consequently allowed more of it to stay above water. Aotearoa 's Zealandia has ten times the land area as our world's New Zealand, is very volcanically active, and has a variety of biomes ranging from subtropical in the north to tundra in the far south.

Like our world's New Zealand, Aotearoa 's Zealandia never gained a significant mammal population other than bats, as no other mammals before man could cross the ocean to get there. However, the volcanism, congenial ecosystem, and lucky weather patterns allowed certain species of dinosaur to survive the K-T extinction event at the end of the Cretaceous -- the only true dinosaurs to survive in the world.

Humans arrived in Aotearoa in much the same way they did in our history -- the Māori arrived around 1280 AD and expanded into many areas of the continent, making headway against the native dinosaurs with some difficulty. After centuries of conflict, the Māori came to see the dinosaurs, particularly the larger species, as taniwha -- supernatural forces and protectors of the forest -- and considered them holy, or tapu . Europeans arrived on the scene in the late 1700s, finding the Māori well-established and eager to trade for modern weapons, but after several unfortunate incidents involving capturing or killing dinosaurs they turned against the Europeans.

Years of warfare followed, only coming to a halt after the arrival of Robert FitzRoy from England, who was able to negotiate peaceful coexistence and form a joint English/Māori government that was as unique in the 1800s as it is today, and which not only built a strong national identity, but also preserved the native Māori culture and property rights and laid a framework for conservation efforts and ecological preserves that the rest of the world has taken as a model.

Please press SPACE to continue.

> Alternate History
Alternate Fauna

> Alternate History
Alternate Fauna

Alternate History
> Alternate Fauna

Alternate History
> Alternate Fauna

> Dinosaurs
Moa
Nanakia

Dinosaurs
> Moa
Nanakia

Dinosaurs
> Moa
Nanakia

> Dinosaurs
Moa
Nanakia

> Dinosaurs
Moa
Nanakia

> Ecology and History
Notoceratops
Oviraptors

Due to volcanism, a favorable ecosystem, and pure dumb luck, several species of dinosaur managed to survive the K-T general extinction on Aotearoa. Competition with birds, bat-derived mammals and man has limited the range of some of the surviving species, but it is still possible to see large communities of Notoceratops in the deep forest, and various oviraptor species are quite common, feeding on the wide variety of reptile and bird eggs available in the bush.

Please press SPACE to continue.

> Ecology and History
Notoceratops
Oviraptors

> Ecology and History
Notoceratops
Oviraptors

Ecology and History
> Notoceratops
Oviraptors

Ecology and History
> Notoceratops
Oviraptors

Notoceratops Māori is a the only known species of ceratopsian dinosaur native to the Southern Hemisphere, and the only living ceratopsian dinosaur still alive in the present day. It is exclusively found in the temperate and tropical forests of Aotearoa, where plentiful supplies of its main dietary staples, ferns and cycads, are found.

Notoceratops is approximately five meters long from nose to tail, and stands approximately two meters tall. It weighs over 2,500 kilograms.

Notoceratops live in small herds and are not particularly aggressive, but can be a significant threat if provoked, due to their enormous size and massive, horned head.

Notoceratops Māori is a Protected Species and any attempts to hunt, kill, capture or otherwise traffic in these animals or body parts of these animals is a felony offense, punishable by up to 18 years in prison.

Please press SPACE to continue.

Ecology and History
> Notoceratops
Oviraptors

Ecology and History
> Notoceratops
Oviraptors

Ecology and History
Notoceratops
> Oviraptors

Ecology and History
Notoceratops
> Oviraptors

Several species of small theropod dinosaurs closely related to the Asian species Oviraptor live in the temperate and tropical zones of Aotearoa. Although popularly believed to eat only eggs, Aotearoan oviraptoroids are carnivorous, with a varied diet that includes small birds, lizards and amphibians. Most species do greatly enjoy eating bird or dinosaur eggs as well and will seek them out if available.

Oviraptoroid dinosaurs in Aotearoa range from 30 cm to 150 cm tall, and generally weigh between 1 and 10 kilograms. All Aotearoan oviraptoroids are Protected Species and any attempts to hunt, kill, capture, or otherwise traffic in these animals or body parts of these animals is a felony offense, punishable by up to 18 years in prison.

Please press SPACE to continue.

Ecology and History
Notoceratops
> Oviraptors

Ecology and History
Notoceratops
> Oviraptors

Ecology and History
> Notoceratops
Oviraptors

Ecology and History
> Notoceratops
Oviraptors

> Ecology and History
Notoceratops
Oviraptors

> Ecology and History
Notoceratops
Oviraptors

> Dinosaurs
Moa
Nanakia

Dinosaurs
> Moa
Nanakia

Dinosaurs
> Moa
Nanakia

The moa are large, herbivorous, flightless birds similar to the emu and cassowary that live throughout Aotearoa. Originally hunted by the Māori, they are now a protected species and thrive throughout the Protected Lands. There are several different species of moa, some of which grow to a height of almost four meters.

Please press SPACE to continue.

Dinosaurs
> Moa
Nanakia

Dinosaurs
> Moa
Nanakia

Dinosaurs
Moa
> Nanakia

Dinosaurs
Moa
> Nanakia

The nanakia -- named for a mischievous forest folk of Māori legend -- are an evolutionary offshoot of bats which have lost the ability to fly and adapted to an arboreal lifestyle similar to that of monkeys and lemurs. They (and other bat-derived species) are the only mammals native to Aotearoa, due to its 80-million-year isolation from other landmasses. The nanakia is intensely curious, prone to mimicry, and relatively friendly to humans. It is occasionally domesticated as a pet, although its penchant for poking into everything it can find makes it generally unwelcome in urban areas.

Please press SPACE to continue.

Dinosaurs
Moa
> Nanakia

Dinosaurs
Moa
> Nanakia

Alternate History
> Alternate Fauna

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
> About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
> About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
> About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

> Geography
History
The Māori Language

The islands of New Zealand, about 2000 miles southeast of Australia between 34 to 47° south latitude, are the only remaining visible portion of the microcontinent of Zealandia. Originally a part of the supercontinent Gondwanaland, New Zealand shares some of its indigenous life with South Africa and Patagonia, which were also originally part of the same ancient landmass.

The microcontinent Zealandia has a thin crust, which caused it to sink below the ocean in the late Cretaceous period. Only the current islands of New Zealand -- 7% of the original land area -- were left behind. New Zealand has two main islands, prosaically named "North Island" and "South Island". Interestingly, the two islands lie on separate tectonic plates despite the fact that they are located very near to each other. The action of these plates leads to quite a bit of geothermal activity and volcanism.

New Zealand has a great variety of terrain, from tall mountain ranges to rich alluvial plains to salt marshes to sandy beaches. Particularly impressive are the fjords of the western coastline of the South Island, created when ancient mountain ranges sank into the Earth via subduction.

Please press SPACE to continue.

> Geography
History
The Māori Language

> Geography
History
The Māori Language

Geography
> History
The Māori Language

Geography
> History
The Māori Language

> Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Geography
> History
The Māori Language

Geography
History
> The Māori Language

Geography
History
> The Māori Language

> Overview
Glossary

Overview
> Glossary

Overview
> Glossary

> Overview
Glossary

> Overview
Glossary

The Māori language -- Te Reo Māori -- like the Māori people, is of Eastern Polynesian origin. It is related to other languages in its group such as Tahitian -- so closely, in fact, that a Tahitian native on Captain James Cook's voyage was able to communicate with the New Zealand Māori, albeit with some difficulty.

The Māori language has twenty letters and digraphs: A Ā E Ē H I Ī K M N O Ō P R T U Ū W NG and WH. The vowels with the lines, or macrons , over them indicate that they have a longer duration than the standard vowels. In the latter half of the twentieth century te reo Māori was in danger of dying out, but recent efforts to preserve it, which include status as an official national language and a program of state-funded Māori language education, have helped to safeguard it as a living language.

Please press SPACE to continue.

> Overview
Glossary

> Overview
Glossary

Overview
> Glossary

Overview
> Glossary

Many Māori words and phrases are used in Aotearoa . They include:

atua -- gods or guardian ancestor spirits
āhahā -- an exclamation of suprise and anger
āniwaniwa -- rainbow
āwhā -- storm
haere rā -- goodbye
haka -- a ceremonial dance
i pai ai -- thank goodness
iwi -- a collection of clans; a nation; a people
kai a te kurī -- a strong, angry profanity
kairākau -- a band of veteran warriors
kaitiakitanga -- ethic of land conservation
kakī mārō -- a very stubborn person
karakia -- blessing or ritual
kauri -- a species of coniferous hardwood
kia ora -- hello
kūmara -- sweet potato
mamae -- leg
mana -- personal force; power; authority
māhunga wai -- idiots, incompetents
paka -- an exclamation of anger or annoyance
pākehā -- a foreigner
pākehā Māori -- a foreigner living among and respected as one of the Māori
pūkeko -- a type of purple swamp hen
rangatira -- a chieftain
ranguru -- a type of seabird
roka -- excrement
tama -- boy
taniwha -- powerful guardian spirit or protector; dinosaur
tapu -- sacred; restricted; prohibited
tara-iti -- a type of seabird
taro -- staple polynesian and asian food plant
tāiko -- a type of seabird
te reo Māori -- the Māori language
tēnā koe -- thank you
toa -- a warrior
tohunga ahurewa -- a priest
tūpuna -- ancestors
waimaria -- good luck
wairua -- soul or spirit
waka -- ocean-going canoe
whakamarumaru -- protector
whenua -- land or country
whenua rāhui -- reserved or protected lands

If you are interested in exploring the Māori language further, a good first step might be the webpage 100 Māori Words Every New Zealander Should Know (http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/culture/maori-language-week/100-maori-words)

Please press SPACE to continue.

Overview
> Glossary

Overview
> Glossary

Geography
History
> The Māori Language

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
> About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

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> Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
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Dedication
About the Author
Credits
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Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
> Glossary of Māori Words

Many Māori words and phrases are used in Aotearoa . They include:

atua -- gods or guardian ancestor spirits
āhahā -- an exclamation of suprise and anger
āniwaniwa -- rainbow
āwhā -- storm
haere rā -- goodbye
haka -- a ceremonial dance
i pai ai -- thank goodness
iwi -- a collection of clans; a nation; a people
kai a te kurī -- a strong, angry profanity
kairākau -- a band of veteran warriors
kaitiakitanga -- ethic of land conservation
kakī mārō -- a very stubborn person
karakia -- blessing or ritual
kauri -- a species of coniferous hardwood
kia ora -- hello
kūmara -- sweet potato
mamae -- leg
mana -- personal force; power; authority
māhunga wai -- idiots, incompetents
paka -- an exclamation of anger or annoyance
pākehā -- a foreigner
pākehā Māori -- a foreigner living among and respected as one of the Māori
pūkeko -- a type of purple swamp hen
rangatira -- a chieftain
ranguru -- a type of seabird
roka -- excrement
tama -- boy
taniwha -- powerful guardian spirit or protector; dinosaur
tapu -- sacred; restricted; prohibited
tara-iti -- a type of seabird
taro -- staple polynesian and asian food plant
tāiko -- a type of seabird
te reo Māori -- the Māori language
tēnā koe -- thank you
toa -- a warrior
tohunga ahurewa -- a priest
tūpuna -- ancestors
waimaria -- good luck
wairua -- soul or spirit
waka -- ocean-going canoe
whakamarumaru -- protector
whenua -- land or country
whenua rāhui -- reserved or protected lands

If you are interested in exploring the Māori language further, a good first step might be the webpage 100 Māori Words Every New Zealander Should Know (http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/culture/maori-language-week/100-maori-words)

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Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
> Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
About the real New Zealand
> Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
> About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
> About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

> Geography
History
The Māori Language

Geography
> History
The Māori Language

Geography
> History
The Māori Language

> Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
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Modern New Zealand
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Discovery by Māori
> Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
> Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

> Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

> Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

New Zealand was uninhabited by human beings until the Polynesian ancestors of the Māori arrived. Archaeologists' best guess as to when this happened was near 1280 AD. The ancestors of the Māori brought along rats and pigs as well as the plants taro and sweet potato to the islands. The animals the settlers brought along with the hunting by the increasing human population drove several species of native birds, including the moa, into extinction.

Until the Māori expanded throughout the islands warfare was limited, but once the best territory was occupied and large game became more scarce, Māori culture shifted to focus more on agriculture. With scarcer resources and a larger population, there were also increases in the number and violence of the conflicts between different iwi , or tribal groups, of Māori.

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> Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
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Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
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> Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
> Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
> Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Dutch explorer Abel Tasman was the first European to reach the islands. He named them Staten Landt , after the States-General of the Netherlands. This name was later changed to Nova Zeelandia after the Dutch province of Zeeland. This eventually was Anglicized into "New Zealand". Tasman made only a brief stop at New Zealand, as the Māori natives attacked and killed several of his crew.

The next European to arrive was British Captain James Cook, who circumnavigated the islands and catalogued its indigenous flora, fauna, and people over the course of two voyages.

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Discovery by Māori
> Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
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Modern New Zealand
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Discovery by Māori
> Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
> British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
> British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Cook's expeditions to New Zealand were followed by several waves of British colonization and trade. Whalers and trading vessels visited New Zealand starting in the 1790s, trading weapons and technology for supplies. The influx of technology inflamed Māori intertribal warfare, causing a series of conflicts that were known as the Musket Wars.

Christian missionaries followed the traders, and became one of the first groups of Europeans to permanently settle in the islands. By 1839, there was a considerable and growing British colonial presence, including the newly-formed New Zealand Company, which moved aggressively to acquire large tracts of Māori land and as a result prompted intervention from the British government to attempt to protect Māori interests.

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Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
> British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
> Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
> Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
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In 1839, the combination of aggressive colonization and lawless behavior among the European settlers prompted the British Crown to move towards annexation of New Zealand as a way to exercise control over the settlement process. William Hobson, a British naval Captain, was sent to negotiate with the Māori for ultimate sovereignty over the islands.

In early 1840 negotiations led to many Māori rangatira (tribal chieftains) signing the Treaty of Waitangi. Under this treaty, the British gained sovereignty over New Zealand, in exchange for ceding the Māori control over their own lands, and granting the Māori the same rights as British citizens, with an eye towards eventual assimilation. Eventually many more rangatira signed the Treaty, and it is widely considered as the fundamental document outlining the ideal of the relationship between the Māori and the British government.

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Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
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Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
> Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
> Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
> Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Of course, the Treaty of Waitangi was not the final word on relations between the Māori and the British colonists. Despite early efforts by Governors-General Robert FitzRoy and George Grey to respect the land rights of the Māori, questionable land sales and exploitation of the Māori continued.

Eventually, certain of the Māori tribes rose up in revolt, fearing the complete loss of their land and livelihood. These uprisings provided the pretext for land seizures, which inflamed the situation further. Legal mechanisms were used to force Māori land to be held in title only by individuals rather than by iwi (tribes), which also contributed to the loss of Māori land. By the mid 1910s more than 75% of the North Island had passed out of Māori ownership, and in the South the Māori retained less than 1% of the land.

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Discovery by Māori
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Modern New Zealand
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Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
> Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
> Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
> Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

In the twentieth century, there was more of an effort made to redress Māori grievances and move toward a more equitable society. Land courts have addressed some of the Māori historic grievances over land seizures and fraudulent sales, and the increasing Māori voice in politics has helped to keep focus on addressing the needs of both ethnic populations within the framework of a united New Zealand society. Māori culture is enjoying a popular renaissance, and the New Zealand economy has become streamlined on a free-market basis.

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Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
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Post-Treaty History
> Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
> Modern New Zealand
Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
> Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
> Further Resources

There is a wealth of information about the history of New Zealand available on the Internet or from your local library. Some good introductory websites follow:

New Zealand History Online -- http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/

Time For Kids Around The World -- http://www.timeforkids.com/TFK/teachers/aw/wr/article/0,28138,1183989,00.html

New Zealand in History -- http://history-nz.org/

In addition, the New Zealand government maintains a website that not only contains a great deal of information about today's New Zealand, but also contains links to cultural and historical information:

Main Site --http://newzealand.govt.nz/

New Zealand historical portal -- http://newzealand.govt.nz/browse/history-heritage/new-zealand-history/

Enjoy!

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Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
> Further Resources

Discovery by Māori
Discovery by Europeans
British Colonization
Treaty of Waitangi
Post-Treaty History
Modern New Zealand
> Further Resources

Geography
> History
The Māori Language

Introduction to Aotearoa
Instructions for Play
Additional Commands
Dedication
About the Author
Credits
Hints
Walkthrough
About the fictional Aotearoa
> About the real New Zealand
Glossary of Māori Words

This one is aimed squarely at children, so it gets oppressive for an adult. It feels like a choose-your-own-adventure book, not in the interaction but in the tone. Relentless exciting heroics happening, and everyone being excited about them the whole time.

Technically it's fairly solid. There are minor bugs but nothing too serious.

The length is good, I finished on the two hour mark.

The Prow
The cutter 's hydrofoil brings the ship high out of the water -- high enough that there's very little spray. The wind whips past as the boat glides across the ocean off the coast to port. Thick, deep green bands of forest snake along the coastline to port. The treeline tracks stretches of black sand beach , sharp cliffs of dark volcanic rock, and the occasional salt marsh . The ocean glares as you look at the shore, almost overpoweringly blue.

A dark feather from some sort of seabird flutters in the wind, caught in a small gap in the guardrail.

[ Individual objects have descriptions, too. You can find out more by examining them. The easiest way to do this is to simply type their names at the command prompt, like so: SALT MARSH. ]

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